British nationalists fail in a Disunited Kingdom

New BNP chairman Adam Walker (left) with the party's puppet master Patrick Harrington: they bear a heavy responsibility for the worst ever nationalist general election.

New BNP chairman Adam Walker (left) with the party’s puppet master Patrick Harrington: they bear a heavy responsibility for the worst ever nationalist general election.

Click here for full nationalist local election results

2015 was always going to be a bad year for the British nationalist movement: in the event it was an utter catastrophe.

The BNP had already shocked nationalists by standing only eight parliamentary candidates – but they reassured anxious members and donors that this year the party had chosen to concentrate on just a handful of its strongest areas.

In the event the party’s results were the worst in its history, with every single candidate polling below 1% – even having concentrated on those supposedly best constituencies. Party chairman Adam Walker, who succeeded Nick Griffin last summer, managed only 0.6% in the racial battleground of Rotherham – down from 10.4% in 2010.

Three party leaders have already resigned after taking responsibility for disappointing results: if he has a shred of honour and decency Mr Walker must surely resign within the next 24 hours. To his credit, BNP London organiser Steve Squire has honestly admitted to the Daily Express that the party might never again contest a general election.

Cathy Duffy – one of only two BNP councillors nationwide – was defeated in the council seat that she had held for the past eight years, and earlier lost her deposit with a feeble 0.9% as General Election candidate in Charnwood (down from 5.8% last time).

Only four nationalist parliamentary candidates achieved over 1%. National Front chairman Kevin Bryan polled 1.0% in Rochdale, while three English Democrat candidates in South Yorkshire managed semi-respectable votes: 1.3% for Ian Sutton in Barnsley Central; 1.1% for his colleague Kevin Riddiough in Barnsley East; and 1.1% for David Allen in the former ED stronghold of Doncaster North.

The sole parliamentary candidate for the British Democratic Party – Dr Jim Lewthwaite – took only 0.5% in Bradford East, even though (like the NF’s Kevin Bryan in Rochdale) he had the advantage of facing an Asian UKIP candidate. The two candidates for Patria each received only 0.2%: Dr Andrew Emerson in Chichester and ex-NF Directorate member Dick Franklin in Bournemouth West.

The various tiny nationalist splinter groups polled miserably: even the well-publicised Islamophobe Paul Weston, standing for his Liberty GB party in Luton South – birthplace of the EDL – scored only 0.4%. In this context 0.9% for Craig Pond – a brave independent nationalist voice in Stoke North – was one of the night’s brighter moments.

Fuller analysis of the state of play for nationalism will appear here and in the next edition of Heritage and Destiny.

 

Nationalist general election results

 

BNP results:

Hornchurch & Upminster – Paul Borg 0.3% (-6.1)
Old Bexley & Sidcup – Nicola Finch 0.5% (-4.2)
Dagenham & Rainham – Tess Culnane 0.4% (-10.8)
Rotherham – Adam Walker 0.6% (-9.8)
Charnwood – Cathy Duffy 0.9% (-4.9)
Boston & Skegness – Robert West 0.3% (-5.0)
Kingswood – Julie Lake 0.3% (-2.4)
Braintree – Paul Hooks 0.2% (-2.0)

 

NF results:

Rochdale – Kevin Bryan 1.0% (-3.9)
Carshalton & Wallington – Richard Edmonds 0.1% (+0.1)
Hull East – Mike Cooper 0.2% (-2.3)
Linlithgow & East Falkirk – Neil McIvor 0.2% (+0.2)
Aberdeen North – Chris Willett 0.4% (+0.4)
Bridgend – Adam Lloyd 0.2% (+0.2)
North Tyneside – Rob Batten 0.4% (-0.9)

 

BDP result:

Bradford East – Dr Jim Lewthwaite 0.5% (+0.5)

 

Independent nationalist result:

Stoke North – Craig Pond 0.9% (+0.9)

 

Patria results:

Bournemouth West – Dick Franklin 0.2% (+0.2)
Chichester – Dr Andrew Emerson 0.2% (+0.2)

 

Liberty GB results

Birmingham Ladywood – Timothy Burton 0.6% (+0.6)
Lewisham West & Penge – George Whale 0.1% (+0.1)
Luton South – Paul Weston 0.4% (+0.4)

 

English Democrat results

Barnsley Central – Ian Sutton 1.3% (+1.3)
Barnsley East – Kevin Riddiough 1.1% (+1.1)
Bath – Jenny Knight 0.1% (+0.1)
Berwick-upon-Tweed – Neil Humphrey 0.2% (+0.2)
Bexleyheath & Crayford – Maggi Young 0.3% (-0.7)
Bradford West – Therese Hirst 0.2% (+0.2)
Brentwood & Ongar – Robin Tilbrook 0.3% (-0.6)
Bury South – Valerie Morris 0.4% (-0.7)
Central Suffolk & North Ipswich – Tony Holyoak 0.3% (+0.3)
Dagenham & Rainham – Kim Gandy 0.2% (+0.2)
Dartford – Steve Uncles 0.4% (-3.9)
Don Valley – Louise Dutton 0.6% (-3.5)
Doncaster Central – Dean Walker 0.8% (-3.6)
Doncaster North – David Allen 1.1% (-4.0)
Erith & Thamesmead – Graham Moore 0.4% (-0.7)
Faversham & Mid Kent – Gary Butler 0.3% (+0.3)
Harlow – Eddy Butler 0.3% (+0.3)
Kettering – Derek Hilling 0.3% (-1.7)
Monmouth – Stephen Morris 0.2% (+0.2)
Nuneaton – Steve Paxton 0.2% (+0.2)
Penistone & Stocksbridge – Colin Porter 1.1% (no change)
Rother Valley – Sharon Pilling 0.8% (+0.8)
Rotherham – Dean Walker 0.4% (+0.4)
Sheffield Brightside & Hillsborough – Justin Saxton 0.4% (+0.4)
Sheffield Central – Elizabeth Breed 0.2% (+0.2)
Sheffield Hallam – Steve Clegg 0.3% (-0.8)
Sheffield Heeley – David Haslett 0.3% (+0.3)
Sheffield South East – Matthew Roberts 0.3% (+0.3)
Southend West – Jeremy Moss 0.4% (-0.9)
Stevenage – Charles Vickers 0.2% (-0.6)
Wentworth & Dearne – Alan England 0.7% (+0.7)
Weston-super-Mare – Clive Lavelle 0.6% (+0.1)

Tory dismay at pro-White campaign

The Conservative candidate in Hull East – the candidate representing the government of the United Kingdom! – seems to have a basic problem with the democratic process.

She told local newspapers:

“What scares me more is we have the National Front standing.  I am genuinely worried about that and I am thinking of not going on the stage with them for the count, because I feel that strongly about it.”

“Because the Electoral Commission has legitimised the National Front, by accepting and approving them as a valid organisation to stand, people think it’s OK.”

“They think it’s legal, so they can vote for them. I don’t understand the mentality of anyone who would support a party whose website says, ‘This is for white people’.”

Election Day 2015

ballot box

Friday 12.30 pm update: Catastrophic results for BNP, especially in Rotherham, Charnwood and Dagenham & Rainham.

Only Kevin Bryan of the NF, plus three EDs, even managed to scrape over 1% on the worst election night for nationalists in living memory.

In Rotherham, BNP chairman Adam Walker polled just 0.6% (down from 10.4% last time).

In Dagenham & Rainham, Tess Culnane for the BNP polled 0.4% (down from 11.2% last time). Cllr Cathy Duffy was yet another to lose her deposit in Charnwood with 0.9% (down from 5.8% last time).

(scroll down for full list of nationalist results as at 12.30 pm on Friday: we are now waiting for just a single result involving an ED candidate in Berwick-on-Tweed.)

A deeply disappointing result for the National Front’s Kevin Bryan who polled 1.0% in Rochdale, down from 4.9% in 2010. Nevertheless this is one of the best nationalist percentages of the election so far: an indication of just how bad 2015 has been for our movement.

Former BNP organiser Ian Sutton polled 1.3% in Barnsley Central as an English Democrat, on what was generally a very poor night for the EDs: if they disappear after this latest setback, at least Mr Sutton and his Barnsley branch can reflect on another creditable campaign.

UKIP polled 17.3% in the traditional nationalist stronghold of Burnley. Not a great result: Labour easily gained the seat from the Lib Dems.  But UKIP will have at least one MP in the new Parliament – Douglas Carswell has held Clacton.

First (semi)-nationalist result was a disaster for the English Democrats in Nuneaton. Just 0.2% in a constituency where the BNP had polled 6.3% in 2010.  Similarly Eddy Butler managed only 0.3% for the EDs in Harlow, where he polled 4.0% as a BNP candidate in 2010.

Likely Tory minority government. Looks as though the few Labour gains will be in areas with demographic change in a non-White direction!  The most surprising aspect (for this author at any rate) has been the defeat of senior Lib Dems such as Vince Cable and Ed Davey in Tory areas of the South East.

Meanwhile in Scotland the SNP has demonstrated that a party that can convince voters of some broader political vision can win remarkable swings in its favour.  We know that the SNP brand is fake nationalism, but it has convinced Scottish voters otherwise.

The ‘United’ Kingdom is deeply disunited.  Conservatives have consolidated their hold on ‘Middle England’; former Labour strongholds in Scotland have seen a landslide to the SNP; while Labour has established complete dominance over English cities, scoring big majorities across Manchester, Birmingham and Inner London – even in seats held for years by the Liberal Democrats.  LD leader Nick Clegg only survived thanks to a massive tactical vote by Sheffield Hallam Tories, and is now a dead man walking.

One scrap of good news was the DUP gain from Alliance in Belfast East.

Best of luck to all nationalist candidates at this year’s elections!  2015 will be a dire year for nationalist parties at the ballot box, though our ideas have never had greater impact with the electorate.

After polls close this website will carry regularly updated news and analysis throughout the early hours of Friday morning.

If you are intending to stay up for at least part of the night, we can now tell you when to expect the first result for a nationalist candidate: it will probably be in Dagenham & Rainham, some time around 1 am.  Tess Culnane is standing here for the BNP, having switched from the NF just before the campaign began.

There will already have been half a dozen or more results by then, but probably none in seats with nationalist candidates.

At about the same time as Tess’s result, we might expect to hear the first English Democrat result in Nuneaton.

Much later on – perhaps at about 2.30 am – we might expect one of the best nationalist results of the night in Rochdale, where the NF’s Kev Bryan is facing (among others) an Asian UKIP candidate.  Not long after Rochdale (perhaps at about 3 am) the result should be declared in Rotherham, another area scarred by ‘grooming’ scandals, where BNP leader Adam Walker faces nemesis for what was once the strongest nationalist party in British electoral history.

All these predictions could be distorted by recounts, whether in close contests or where a candidate is hovering around the 5% mark that determines retention or loss of a £500 deposit.

Confirmed nationalist results so far:

BNP – 8 candidates
Hornchurch & Upminster – Paul Borg 0.3% (-6.1)
Old Bexley & Sidcup – Nicola Finch 0.5% (-4.2)
Dagenham & Rainham – Tess Culnane 0.4% (-10.8)
Rotherham – Adam Walker 0.6% (-9.8)
Charnwood – Cathy Duffy 0.9% (-4.9)
Boston & Skegness – Robert West 0.3% (-5.0)
Kingswood – Julie Lake 0.3% (-2.4)
Braintree – Paul Hooks 0.2% (-2.0)

NF – 7 candidates
Rochdale – Kevin Bryan 1.0% (-3.9)
Carshalton & Wallington – Richard Edmonds 0.1% (+0.1)
Hull East – Mike Cooper 0.2% (-2.3)
Linlithgow & East Falkirk – Neil McIvor 0.2% (+0.2)
Aberdeen North – Chris Willett 0.4% (+0.4)
Bridgend – Adam Lloyd 0.2% (+0.2)
North Tyneside – Rob Batten 0.4% (-0.9)

British Democrats – 1 candidate
Bradford East – Dr Jim Lewthwaite 0.5% (+0.5)

Patria – 2 candidates
Bournemouth West – Dick Franklin 0.2% (+0.2)
Chichester – Dr Andrew Emerson 0.2% (+0.2)

English Democrats – 32 candidates
Barnsley Central – Ian Sutton 1.3% (+1.3)
Barnsley East – Kevin Riddiough 1.1% (+1.1)
Bath – Jenny Knight 0.1% (+0.1)
Berwick-upon-Tweed – Neil Humphrey
Bexleyheath & Crayford – Maggi Young 0.3% (-0.7)
Bradford West – Therese Hirst 0.2% (+0.2)
Brentwood & Ongar – Robin Tilbrook 0.3% (-0.6)
Bury South – Valerie Morris 0.4% (-0.7)
Central Suffolk and North Ipswich – Tony Holyoak 0.3% (+0.3)
Dagenham & Rainham – Kim Gandy 0.2% (+0.2)
Dartford – Steve Uncles 0.4% (-3.9)
Don Valley – Louise Dutton 0.6% (-3.5)
Doncaster Central – Dean Walker 0.8% (-3.6)
Doncaster North – David Allen 1.1% (-4.0)
Erith & Thamesmead – Graham Moore 0.4% (-0.7)
Faversham & Mid Kent – Gary Butler 0.3% (+0.3)
Harlow – Eddy Butler 0.3% (+0.3)
Kettering – Derek Hilling 0.3% (-1.7)
Monmouth – Stephen Morris 0.2% (+0.2)
Nuneaton – Steve Paxton 0.2% (+0.2)
Penistone & Stocksbridge – Colin Porter 1.1% (no change)
Rother Valley – Sharon Pilling 0.8% (+0.8)
Rotherham – Dean Walker 0.4% (+0.4)
Sheffield Brightside & Hillsborough – Justin Saxton 0.4% (+0.4)
Sheffield Central – Elizabeth Breed 0.2% (+0.2)
Sheffield Hallam – Steve Clegg 0.3% (-0.8)
Sheffield Heeley – David Haslett 0.3% (+0.3)
Sheffield South East – Matthew Roberts 0.3% (+0.3)
Southend West – Jeremy Moss 0.4% (-0.9)
Stevenage – Charles Vickers 0.2% (-0.6)
Wentworth & Dearne – Alan England 0.7% (+0.7)
Weston-super-Mare – Clive Lavelle 0.6% (+0.1)

Liberty GB – 3 candidates
Birmingham Ladywood – Timothy Burton 0.6% (+0.6)
Lewisham West & Penge – George Whale 0.1% (+0.1)
Luton South – Paul Weston 0.4% (+0.4)

Independent
Stoke North – Craig Pond 0.9% (+0.9)

The Myth of the Muslim Vote

Miliband ethnics

Many nationalist blogs and forums would have you believe that Muslim voters exercise significant political power, forcing party leaders to curry favour with them at the expense of White voters.

But is this true?  There is no doubt that the number of Muslim voters in Britain has increased dramatically in recent years, as children and grandchildren of the original Asian immigrant generations have grown up, and their numbers have been swelled by more recent arrivals from Africa.  Also there is no doubt that Muslims tend to turn out to vote at elections, in much greater proportions than some other minority groups such as the (mainly Christian) Afro-Caribbeans.

Nevertheless to have real influence even in a very close contest such as next week’s general election, Muslims would need to have two extra factors on their side: they would have to be concentrated in potentially marginal seats, and it would have to be credible that they could switch between the major contending parties.

The truth is that neither of these factors apply.  There are forty constituencies (out of the UK total 650) that are more than 15% Muslim, and of these only five are truly in the balance: two Lib Dem held seats being targeted by Labour (Birmingham Yardley and Bradford East), and most crucially three presently Conservative seats on Labour’s key target list (Pendle, Dewsbury and Ilford North).  In the latter case the importance of the Jewish vote (6.5% – plus ethnic Jews who are listed on the census as ‘no religion’) partly counterbalances the Muslim vote (15.3%), and the odds are that pro-Israel Tory MP Lee Scott will survive. Meanwhile in Pendle and Dewsbury the influence of UKIP will probably combine with Muslims moving from Lib Dem to Labour, and produce Labour gains.  In Bradford East the incumbent Lib Dem MP David Ward has desperately burnished his anti-Zionist credentials in a bid to avoid what seems sure defeat.

Of the rest 33 are safe Labour while one – Brent Central – is a certain Labour gain from the Lib Dems this year, and is such an ethnic and religious hotchpotch that its 21.2% Muslim population could never be seen as decisive anyway. Birmingham Hall Green was close in 2010 only because of the strong Respect campaign by local councillor Salma Yaqoob. With her retirement and the decline of Respect everywhere outside George Galloway’s Bradford, Hall Green is sure to be safe Labour this year.

That leaves just Bradford West – 51.3% Muslim and sensationally won by George Galloway in a 2012 by-election – where we really do see a contest that is all about the Muslim vote, though with many local peculiarites (in this case ‘local’ means Pakistani village politics transferred to Yorkshire).  Galloway will almost certainly win, but this underlines the real truth that Muslim voters will have very little influence on the outcome of the 2015 General Election, and very little influence on the next government.

Farage trousers £1 million from Jewish pornographer

Farage-Desmond

This evening the Daily Express proudly announced that its owner Richard Desmond had donated a further £1 million to UKIP, following a £300,000 donation from Desmond to the party at the end of last year.  The Express tycoon was a major donor to Tony Blair’s Labour party fifteen years ago, but fell out with Labour in 2004.

The article is accompanied by photographs of Farage grovelling in Desmond’s office.  The UKIP leader said:

“Richard is a self-made man with the courage of his convictions.  I know there are a lot more people out there who agree in private but I hope this public gesture encourages others to follow his example.”

Desmond is known for his Europhobia – he once goosestepped around a boardroom and ranted that all Germans were Nazis, during a meeting with executives from the Daily Telegraph.

But how exactly did this “self-made man” acquire his fortune?

After leaving school at 15, Desmond made his first money through contacts in the music industry, and his first ventures into publishing were also connected to jazz and pop.

In 1983 he acquired the UK licence for the American porn magazine Penthouse and soon expanded into a range of similar publications, many catering for somewhat specialist tastes such as Asian Babes.  Desmond’s empire soon encompassed telephone chat lines, websites and cable/satellite TV channels such as Television X, which he promoted with the slogan: “Television X offers the best in British porn”.

Several Jewish community leaders were nervous when Richard Desmond was appointed head of the Jewish charity Norwood in 2006.  The Jewish Chronicle ran a front page story headlined ‘Pornographer’s charity post sparks protests’, and criticised the appointment in its editorial.  (Notably neither of these items is still online, and by 2012 the JC had made its peace with Desmond, publishing a long feature about his emotional family visit to Auschwitz.)

Desmond’s friends rallied round.  Cyril Paskin – former ‘field commander’ of the ultra-violent Jewish 62 Group – was especially vocal:
“It’s diabolical. Richard is a very, very good man. He is a giving person in every respect – not just money, but his time too. He has a heart of gold. He should be a Sir. We don’t need other Jews running him down.”

Paskin’s former 62 Group bagman Gerald Ronson (founder of the Community Security Trust) also weighed in to support the porn baron:
“I speak as a friend and supporter of Richard. Every time I’ve ever asked him for anything he’s always given. He’s a talented and hardworking man who devotes most of his free time to charity. He gives equally to Jewish and non-Jewish causes. He’s a good person – and so is his wife Janet who’s a wonderful influence on him. I have no doubt that, with all his charity work, it won’t be very long before he sets up his own charitable foundation and becomes the biggest giver in the UK.”

He’s certainly the biggest giver now – to UKIP’s general election campaign!

UKIP supporters of a prudish disposition would be advised to look away now…

In 2009 two of their latest million-pound donor’s companies were fined for extreme pornographic offences against the broadcast code.

The broadcasting regulator Ofcom said that the £25,000 fine imposed on RHF Productions was for daytime promotions for two websites containing “extremely sexually explicit material” that could be viewed by consumers without any need for registration or age verification.

“Broadcasters must ensure that they do not promote websites giving access to free-to-view sexually explicit material without any protections,” said Ofcom in its ruling. “This is particularly important when such references may be seen by children.”

Meanwhile another Desmond company Portland TV was fined £27,500 for broadcasting hardcore pornography on a show entitled Bathroom Bitches.  The details of the Ofcom judgment are too explicit for us to publish on this website.  But clearly Nigel Farage has no qualms about his party’s latest donor.

Nationalist General Election candidates 2015

ballot boxNominations have just closed for this year’s UK general election, with nationalist parties at their lowest ebb for many decades. (see also local election candidates list)

Our ideas have never had greater traction, but the decline of our movement following the collapse of Nick Griffin’s BNP is becoming starkly obvious as details emerge of the low number of nationalist candidates nationwide.

The biggest shock so far is that there will be only eight BNP parliamentary candidates nationwide (down from 338 in 2010).  Moreover there will only be one BNP candidate even at council level in Burnley, where the party was once the official opposition and seemed likely to gain power.

The NF will have seven parliamentary candidates and the British Democratic Party one.  The English Democrats (a party which contains numerous defectors from the BNP but also many with no connection to racial nationalism) has many more – 32, including one just over the Welsh border in Monmouth!

The cities of LeedsManchester and Liverpool will have no nationalist parliamentary candidates – not even an ED.

This page will report on confirmed candidatures as details are released by returning officers across the country.

There are no BNP candidates this year in the party’s former stronghold of Bradford, though in Bradford East Dr Jim Lewthwaite of the British Democrats will be his party’s only parliamentary candidate at its first general election.  Dr Lewthwaite is a former BNP councillor, and may be helped by UKIP fielding an Asian candidate in this constituency.

Cathy Duffy – one of only two surviving BNP councillors – is BNP candidate for her local Leicestershire constituency of Charnwood, though the other remaining BNP councillor Brian Parker is not contesting his Lancashire constituency Pendle. There are no BNP candidates (whether parliamentary, local council or mayoral) in the Cumbrian borough of Copeland, where the party head office is based.

Meanwhile in one of the early surprises of this election, nationalist veteran Tess Culnane will contest Dagenham & Rainham for the BNP, having recently returned to the party following several years in the National Front.  (However there will be no nationalist candidate in next door Barking, which saw Nick Griffin’s high profile campaign last time.) New BNP chairman Adam Walker, who ousted Nick Griffin in a palace coup last year, is standing in Rotherham, where he has the misfortune to face an English Democrat candidate also named Walker.

The NF has only just had its registration confirmed by the Electoral Commission following many months of turmoil, and has done well to organise seven parliamentary campaigns across the UK at short notice, including Richard Edmonds in Carshalton & Wallington, and party leader Kevin Bryan in Rochdale.  Two NF candidates will stand in Scottish constituencies: Chris Willett in Aberdeen North and Neil McIvor in Linlithgow & East Falkirk.

Nationalist independents this year include ex-BNP and EFP activist Craig Pond, who will contest Stoke North – notably there is not a single BNP candidate anywhere in Stoke, which alongside Burnley was once a party stronghold.

One of the most effective BNP defectors to the English Democrats, Ian Sutton is ED candidate for Barnsley Central, while his ED colleague Kevin Riddiough will contest Barnsley East.  The strongest area for the EDs this year appears to be South Yorkshire, where they will contest all fifteen parliamentary seats.  Former BNP electoral strategist Eddy Butler will once again be ED candidate for Harlow, despite rumours that he was quitting, though his former colleague Chris Beverley appears to have decided to take a break from politics after several years of committed activism for the BNP and EDs.

Another former BNP candidate – Dr Andrew Emerson – is standing for his Patria party in Chichester. Patria will also field Dick Franklin in Bournemouth West.

No nationalist candidates will stand this year in Oldham – the town which kick-started the brief 21st century revival of the BNP with the 2001 riots – but after a very slow start the local UKIP branch has picked up enough strength to contest all of the local council as well as parliamentary seats here. (Oldham is one of the few towns so far to have announced full lists of local candidates: most of the country will not confirm these until tomorrow or later.)

Former UKIP candidate Paul Weston – who attempted to create a political wing of the English Defence League and has visited Canada to speak at a rally of the Jewish terrorist group JDL – is standing on an anti-Islamic ticket in Luton South for his new party Liberty GB.  His registered description on the ballot paper will be “No to terrorism, yes to Britain”.  He will no doubt be helped by UKIP selecting an Asian candidate here – and not at all hindered by the foolish Matthew Collins, an ex-NF member who now poses as some sort of ‘insider’ expert on British nationalism.  Collins seems to think that Weston has founded yet another new party: he hasn’t.  Weston’s ballot paper description is one of several registered by Liberty GB with the Electoral Commission. (George Whale is standing in Lewisham West and Penge under the same description, while Timothy Burton in Birmingham Ladywood is using the slogan ‘Vote for real people, not politicians!’)

Further news of nationalist general election candidates will appear here later, and there will be extensive news updates and analysis throughout the campaign.  Best of luck to all those brave and hardy campaigners who will fly the flag for nationalism in an exceptionally tough year!

Confirmed nationalist results so far

BNP – 8 candidates
Hornchurch & Upminster – Paul Borg 0.3% (-6.1)
Old Bexley & Sidcup – Nicola Finch 0.5% (-4.2)
Dagenham & Rainham – Tess Culnane 0.4% (-10.8)
Rotherham – Adam Walker 0.6% (-9.8)
Charnwood – Cathy Duffy
Boston & Skegness – Robert West
Kingswood – Julie Lake
Braintree – Paul Hooks

NF – 7 candidates
Rochdale – Kevin Bryan 1.0% (-3.9)
Carshalton & Wallington – Richard Edmonds 0.1% (+0.1)
Hull East – Mike Cooper 0.2% (-2.3)
Linlithgow & East Falkirk – Neil McIvor 0.2% (+0.2)
Aberdeen North – Chris Willett 0.4% (+0.4)
Bridgend – Adam Lloyd
North Tyneside – Rob Batten 0.4% (-0.9)

British Democrats – 1 candidate
Bradford East – Dr Jim Lewthwaite 0.5% (+0.5)

Patria – 2 candidates
Bournemouth West – Dick Franklin
Chichester – Dr Andrew Emerson

English Democrats – 32 candidates
Barnsley Central – Ian Sutton 1.3% (+1.3)
Barnsley East – Kevin Riddiough 1.1% (+1.1)
Bath – Jenny Knight 0.1% (+0.1)
Berwick-upon-Tweed – Neil Humphrey
Bexleyheath & Crayford – Maggi Young 0.3% (-0.7)
Bradford West – Therese Hirst
Brentwood & Ongar – Robin Tilbrook 0.3% (-0.6)
Bury South – Valerie Morris 0.4% (-0.7)
Central Suffolk and North Ipswich – Tony Holyoak
Dagenham & Rainham – Kim Gandy 0.2% (+0.2)
Dartford – Steve Uncles
Don Valley – Louise Dutton 0.6% (-3.5)
Doncaster Central – Dean Walker 0.8% (-3.6)
Doncaster North – David Allen 1.1% (-4.0)
Erith & Thamesmead – Graham Moore 0.4% (-0.7)
Faversham & Mid Kent – Gary Butler
Harlow – Eddy Butler 0.3% (+0.3)
Kettering – Derek Hilling 0.3% (-1.7)
Monmouth – Stephen Morris
Nuneaton – Steve Paxton 0.2% (+0.2)
Penistone & Stocksbridge – Colin Porter
Rother Valley – Sharon Pilling 0.8% (+0.8)
Rotherham – Dean Walker 0.4% (+0.4)
Sheffield Brightside & Hillsborough – Justin Saxton 0.4% (+0.4)
Sheffield Central – Elizabeth Breed 0.2% (+0.2)
Sheffield Hallam – Steve Clegg 0.3% (-0.8)
Sheffield Heeley – David Haslett 0.3% (+0.3)
Sheffield South East – Matthew Roberts 0.3% (+0.3)
Southend West – Jeremy Moss 0.4% (-0.9)
Stevenage – Charles Vickers 0.2% (-0.6)
Wentworth & Dearne – Alan England 0.7% (+0.7)
Weston-super-Mare – Clive Lavelle

Liberty GB – 3 candidates
Birmingham Ladywood – Timothy Burton 0.6% (+0.6)
Lewisham West & Penge – George Whale 0.1% (+0.1)
Luton South – Paul Weston

Independent
Stoke North – Craig Pond

Scotland and the Politics of Identity

The Scottish National Party's Alex Salmond and Hamza Yousaf prior to a swearing-in ceremony at the Scottish Parliament.

The Scottish National Party’s Alex Salmond and Hamza Yousaf prior to a swearing-in ceremony at the Scottish Parliament.

The UK general election campaign has already begun to focus on the politics of identity  not (perish the thought) racial identity, nor even any form of English or British identity  but, needless to say, Scottish identity.

One might have thought the narrow failure of the Scottish National Party (SNP) in last year’s independence referendum would have buried the issue, at least for a while, as happened with their previous failure in the 1979 referendum.  But it seems that the SNP is likely to achieve record gains at the election on May 7th, and party leader Nicola Sturgeon was widely seen as the most successful performer at the seven-way leaders’ debate on April 2nd.

This morning’s news bulletins led with allegations in the Daily Telegraph that Ms Sturgeon had privately expressed a preference for a Conservative rather than Labour election victory, during leaked conversation with a French diplomat.

This might have been cynical calculation: while racial nationalist parties such as the NF and BNP have traditionally benefited from periods of Labour government which wind up the natural resentment of their supporters, conversely the SNP might have been expected to benefit from disgust north of the border at yet another Tory tenancy of Downing Street.

H&D readers can be forgiven for asking just what is Scottish nationalism?  The SNP seems to favour reclaiming sovereignty from Westminster, but surrendering it to Brussels.  And of course the party is eager to embrace as “Scottish” just about any type of immigrant, while rejecting fellow Britons as colonisers.

 

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