Nationalist candidates in this year’s elections

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Following our article on election nominations earlier this week, we can confirm the following candidates are standing for nationalist parties at county council and other elections on May 4th.

BNP – 12 candidates

Essex
Halstead – Paul Hooks
Heybridge & Tollesbury – Richard Perry
Maldon – Trevor Cable
Pitsea (2 vacancies) – Paul Borg and Christine Winter

Kent
Dartford NE – Ronald Ball
Dartford W – Michael Cope
Swanley – Cliff Le May

Hampshire
Hayling Island – John Moore

Lancashire
Nelson E – John Rowe
Pendle C – Brian Parker

Lincolnshire
Louth S – Robert Ashton


National Front – 4 candidates

Aberdeen
Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen – Dave MacDonald
Torry & Ferryhill – Billy Watson

Bridgend
Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd – Adam Lloyd

Lancashire
Whitworth & Bacup – Kevin Bryan


English Democrats – 4 candidates (we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Bury
Besses (by-election) – Steve Morris

Cambridgeshire & Peterborough
Mayoral election – Stephen Goldspink

Essex
Ongar & Rural – Robin Tilbrook

Greater Manchester
Mayoral election – Steve Morris


British Resistance – 2 candidates

Worcestershire
Gorse Hill & Warndon – Linda Bell
Nunnery – Carl Mason


British Democratic Party

Leicestershire
Loughborough S – Kevan Stafford


Patria

West Sussex
Chichester W – Dr Andrew Emerson
(also contesting a simultaneous borough by-election in East Wittering, Chichester)


Independent

Durham
Spennymoor – Pete Molloy

 

BNP boosted by UKIP’s disappearance in Pendle

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Nominations closed on Tuesday for various local elections being held across most of the UK (except London) on May 4th.

As expected there will be very few candidates from traditional nationalist parties, with most interest focused on just how far UKIP declines. In several (especially northern) counties UKIP have lost about half of their candidates.

For example, we now know that UKIP will have 36 candidates in Lancashire this year, compared to 63 last time; similarly in Cumbria the UKIP candidate list is down from 52 to 23; in North Yorkshire down from 48 to 24; in Durham down from 31 to 14; and in Derbyshire down from 54 to 38.  Further south and east the party has more candidates, though weaker in the South West: down from 48 to 24 in Somerset and from 77 to 21 in Cornwall. The biggest decline is in Wiltshire, where UKIP had 54 candidates last time, but only 8 this year.

One early surprise is in Pendle (part of Lancashire County Council) where the BNP will have two candidates, neither of them opposed by UKIP. Long-serving borough councillor Brian Parker faces Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat opponents in the Pendle Central division, while his colleague John Rowe has only Labour and Conservative opponents (both Asian) in Nelson East.

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

 

 

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

Kevan Stafford of the British Democrats will contest the Loughborough South division of Leicestershire, his party’s sole candidate.

The National Front will have four candidates across the UK: chairman Kevin Bryan is standing in the Whitworth & Bacup division of Lancashire. Unfortunately (like Mr Stafford of the Brit Dems) he has UKIP opposition.

Dave MacDonald (Mr Bryan’s successor as NF chairman) is contesting the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen City Council.  Mr MacDonald is of course already an elected community councillor in the Aberdeen suburb of Garthdee. Also in Aberdeen, the NF’s Billy Watson is contesting the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

Mr MacDonald’s former deputy Adam Lloyd is NF candidate for Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd ward, Bridgend.

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Three BNP candidates are standing in Kent: former GLA candidate Cliff Le May in Swanley; Ronald Ball in Dartford NE; and Michael Cope in Dartford West.  Mr Le May is the only one without UKIP opposition: bearing in mind UKIP polled almost 20% in Swanley four years ago, he will be hopeful of a good result in their absence.

There are five BNP candidates in Essex (compared to 14 in 2013 and 75 in 2009): former Braintree parliamentary candidate Paul Hooks in Halstead; Paul Borg and Christine Winter in the two-councillor Pitsea division; Richard Perry in Heybridge & Tollesbury; and Trevor Cable in Maldon. The latter two are standing under the label Fighting Unsustainable Housing Because We Care (which the party has successfully used to win parish council seats in the past without mentioning the BNP name).  We don’t yet know whether this time the name BNP will appear on the ballot paper in these two divisions.

British Resistance (the party founded by supporters of ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate Jack Sen) have two candidates in Worcestershire: former BNP organiser Carl Mason in Nunnery; and Linda Bell in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Former BNP parliamentary candidate Dr Andrew Emerson is Patria candidate for the Chichester West division of West Sussex. Dr Emerson is also contesting a borough council by-election on the same day in East Wittering ward, Chichester.

Robin Tilbrook - is the ED party over?

Robin Tilbrook – is the ED party over?

Following the imprisonment of former party official Steve Uncles for election fraud, English Democrats candidates are notable by their absence. There are no ED candidates in the former stronghold Doncaster – which has an all-out council and mayoral election this year with no ED presence. So far we only know about party leader Robin Tilbrook, standing in his local Essex division Ongar & Rural, plus ED mayoral candidates Steve Morris in Greater Manchester and Stephen Goldspink in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. Steve Morris is also contesting a by-election in Besses ward, Bury.

Robert Ashton is BNP candidate for the Louth South division of Lincolnshire, while John Moore is contesting the Hayling Island division of Hampshire.

Former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy is standing as an independent in the Spennymoor division of Durham (technically a unitary authority rather than a county council). Despite this being the home of party leader Adam Walker, there are no BNP candidates in Durham, nor in Cumbria where the party’s head office is located.

Further news of candidates and campaigns will be posted as we get it. So far H&D believes that the BNP has 12 county council candidates in total, compared to 92 at the last county elections in 2013.

According to H&D‘s (unofficial) calculation, UKIP have 1,037 candidates for the county councils this year: that’s down from 1,494 last time. There are also six unitary authorities that are directly comparable, having elections both in 2013 and this year.  In those six councils combined, UKIP has 85 candidates this year, compared to 242 last time.

There has been a real UKIP collapse in three unitary council areas – Cornwall (from 77 candidates to 21), Wiltshire (from 54 to 8), and Shropshire (from 29 to 9).
By contrast in several South Eastern or Eastern counties UKIP has maintained pretty solid slates: 69 in Kent, 60 in West Sussex, 59 in Essex, 57 in Surrey and 54 in Norfolk.
NOTE: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy was at one time briefly a member of British Voice. We apologise for this error.

Lib Dems play race card against UKIP candidate

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

Shneur Odze – Orthodox Jewish rabbi and UKIP candidate for the first Greater Manchester mayoral election on 4th May 2017 – is once again in trouble because his religious practices clash with political correctness.

More than three years ago when Rabbi Odze (a member of the Lubavitcher Jewish sect) was on the UKIP slate for North West England at the European Parliamentary election, he made national headlines because Orthodox Jewish “religious modesty” laws forbid him to have physical contact with women. Dr Fred McGlade resigned as UKIP’s North West regional organiser in February 2014 because he felt it was inappropriate for Odze to be a candidate.  The national UKIP leadership – cynically aware that having Odze on the ticket might help them distance their party from the “far right” took the rabbi’s side, and Dr McGlade quit the party.

Last weekend the issue was raised again by Liberal Democrat mayoral candidate Jane Brophy, who complained that Odze refused to shake her hand at a hustings event – not because he objects to Lib Dems, but because he refuses on principle to shake hands with women.

Ms Brophy said:
“I think if you’re standing for a position then religion shouldn’t come into it. I should be treated equally as a woman, as a candidate, as everybody here.”

Perhaps a more serious objection to Rabbi Odze standing as a candidate is that when serving as a Tory councillor in Hackney in 2004, he was censured and suspended from the council for three months after removing a sack of electoral registration forms from the Town Hall and delivering them to a local newspaper in what he claimed was a stunt to reveal poor security. His suspension followed failure to complete a supervised ethical training programme.

The panel censuring Odze commented:
“The evidence indicates that Councillor Odze was, at the least in part, motivated by a wish to compromise the Mayoral election. The evidence suggests that Councillor Odze was aware that what he was doing was wrong, that he was misusing confidential information and that his actions likely to bring his office into disrepute. …Cllr Odze undermined public confidence in the Council and he encouraged a member of staff to breach their contract of employment by co-opting them to assist him in this plan.
As stated above the breach of trust involved in the incident was such as to go to the heart of the relationship between Councillor Odze and the Council. It is difficult to imagine a more serious case being referred back to the Council for local determination.”

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