Arron Banks stands aside in Clacton as part of long-term plan for post-UKIP movement

Raheem Kassam (far right) visiting the U.S. President-Elect at Trump Tower, with Banks, Farage and colleagues from UKIP and Breitbart

Arron Banks (second left) visiting the U.S. President-Elect at Trump Tower, with Nigel Farage, Raheem Kassam and colleagues from UKIP and Breitbart

Former UKIP donor Arron Banks has announced that he will not after all be standing at the General Election in the Clacton constituency.

Banks had earlier planned to stand against former UKIP MP Douglas Carswell, a bitter factional opponent of Banks and his ally Nigel Farage.

But once Carswell announced his retirement, it was only a matter of time before Banks threw in the towel.

After all, Banks no longer has any real interest in UKIP – and neither does Farage. They will have little or no involvement with the party leadership during what is likely to be a disastrous campaign, but will eschew divisive attacks on the Paul Nuttall regime until after June 8th, and will give support to various constituency-level campaigns.

Then within a day or so of the election results, the Farage faction (bankrolled by Banks) will acknowledge UKIP’s death and announce the creation of a new ‘Patriotic Movement’.

On April 25th Banks issued a Twitter message, very sensibly criticising the UKIP leadership’s anti-Islam obsession

 

Arron Banks
(@Arron_banks)

Not sure campaigning with the national party going in entirely the wrong direction is smart. I don’t approve of the war on Muslim religion https://t.co/BcKQtka2yW

April 25, 2017

Later that day UKIP’s election campaign became even more chaotic when James Carver (a West Midlands MEP) resigned as the party’s chief foreign affairs spokesman, saying that he “strongly disagreed” with the “misguided policy” of a so-called burqa ban.

Best ever vote for French National Front

Marine Le Pen - FN Congress

Marine Le Pen of the French National Front (Front National) has qualified for the second-round run-off in the French presidential elections with 21.3%, according to official final results from the first round released this afternoon. She will face ‘centrist’ candidate Emmanuel Macron in the second round, after Macron won the first round with 24.0%.

We should also bear in mind that the traditionalist conservative and eurosceptic Nicolas Dupont-Aignan polled 4.7% – better than expected – which ought logically to go to Marine Le Pen in the second round. By contrast the official conservative candidate François Fillon confirmed last night that the mainstream French right has committed suicide: he called on his supporters to vote for Macron in the second round – indicating that whatever happens in two weeks time, only Le Pen and the FN stand for genuine change in France.

The previous best FN result was in 2002, when Mme Le Pen’s father Jean-Marie Le Pen (the party’s founder) won 16.9% and similarly qualified for the second round.

Speaking to FN activists last night, Marine Le Pen said:

You have brought me to the second round of the presidential election. I’d like to express my most profound gratitude. The first step that should lead the French people to the l’Elysée has been taken. This is a historic result.

It is also an act of French pride, the act of a people lifting their heads. It will have escaped no one that the system tried by every means possible to stifle the great political debate that must now take place. The French people now have a very simple choice: either we continue on the path to complete deregulation, or you choose France.

You now have the chance to choose real change. This is what I propose: real change/ It is time to liberate the French nation from arrogant elites who want to dictate how it must behave. Because yes, I am the candidate of the people.

The May-June 2017 edition of Heritage and Destiny will carry extended analysis of the French election and other European developments that contrast with the dismal state of racial nationalism (and even the UKIP-style right) in the UK.

 

Farage flies home: last chance for UKIP?

Will Nigel Farage return to spearhead UKIP's General Election campaign, displacing his useless successor Paul Nuttall (right)

Will Nigel Farage return to spearhead UKIP’s General Election campaign, displacing his useless successor Paul Nuttall (right)

Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage is flying back to London from his Adriatic holiday, after Theresa May surprised the nation by calling a snap General Election for June 8th.

Farage’s key financial backer Arron Banks had planned to launch a long-expected new movement – the Patriotic Alliance – on May 5th, the day after what are likely to be disastrous local elections for UKIP.

He and other Faragistes were expected to conclude that UKIP was finished and it was time for a new approach.

At a stroke Mrs May has rendered these plans redundant, and just possibly UKIP has been handed a last-minute lifeline: but only if the present party leadership – headed by the hapless Paul Nuttall – has the courage and maturity to end Banks’s suspension and recall Farage for one last campaign.

The next question would be whether UKIP should contest every single constituency, presenting itself as an alternative government, or concentrate on a smaller number of seats held by pro-Remain MPs. The latter strategy would amount to accepting that UKIP is not a challenger for power across a range of policy areas, and is more of a pressure group to ensure that Brexit goes ahead unimpeded by recalcitrant Remainers.

Meanwhile it is understood that because Parliament will be prorogued the day before the scheduled Manchester Gorton by-election, that by-election will be cancelled: a successor to the late Sir Gerald Kaufman will be elected on June 8th as part of the General Election alongside every other constituency.

 

Does Theresa May believe in anything?

New Prime Minister Theresa May, alongside Sir Eric Pickles (chairman of Conservative Friends of Israel) declares "I am a Jew"

Prime Minister Theresa May, alongside Sir Eric Pickles (chairman of Conservative Friends of Israel) declares “I am a Jew”

Prime Minister Theresa May today called a General Election to be held on Thursday 8th June. Technically this will require a two-thirds majority in the House of Commons, but we can assume that Britain will be heading to the polls for the second time in two years.

H&D will provide continuous coverage of the election campaign from a nationalist perspective, but one immediate question is unavoidable.

Does the Prime Minister really believe in anything?

In her Downing Street statement a few minutes ago, Mrs May said she was seeking a mandate to negotiate Brexit terms, and accused opposition parties of “playing games”.

Yet all the evidence shows that until last year’s referendum, Mrs May fully supported our membership of the European Union. Though she craftily kept a low profile during the referendum campaign, she assented to the scaremongering campaign of her predecessor David Cameron and his Chancellor George Osborne, who insisted that Brexit would be an unmitigated disaster.

Can voters really trust a Prime Minister who changes her mind on this central issue, purely for reasons of ambition and convenience?

After all, Mrs May has never given the slightest rationale for her change of mind: assuming she actually has a genuine view on Brexit – or on anything.

UKIP’s political correctness backfires as Jewish candidate burns bible

A Bible set alight by UKIP candidate Rabbi Shneur Odze, who posted the image online

A Bible set alight by UKIP candidate Rabbi Shneur Odze, who posted the image online

Shneur Odze was supposed to be UKIP’s ace card against opponents who suggested the party was “racist” or had any connection to the NF or BNP.

After all, Shneur Odze is not only a UKIP activist but a rabbi from the ultra-orthodox Jewish sect Chabad Lubavitch (which unlike some other ultra-orthodox groups is extremely pro-Zionist).

So it was no surprise to see UKIP select Rabbi Odze as the party’s candidate for the new “super-mayoral” election in Greater Manchester, covering a vast region with a population around 2.75 million.

The wheels started to come off the Odze campaign when as H&D reported last month, the Liberal Democrats played the race card by drawing attention to the Rabbi’s religious objection to shaking hands with women.

Then real disaster struck this week after Rabbi Odze publicly burned a Bible.

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

This incident stemmed from long-running hostility between Chabad Lubavitch and so-called “Messianic Jews”, i.e. people who were born Jews but converted to Christianity, and now seek to proselytise their new faith among Jewry.

Whatever one thinks of these tactics – placing a Hebrew-language New Testament inside a synagogue – it was no doubt unwise for Rabbi Odze to respond by publicly burning a Bible. Can one imagine UKIP tolerating a Muslim candidate who burned a Bible, or anyone of any faith who burned a Jewish text or artefact?

But of course UKIP’s leadership (like the rest of the political establishment) has long taken the view that certain groups qualify for “special treatment”.

Le Pen stays ahead as French Conservatism dies

Marine-Le-Pen 2017

French National Front (FN) leader Marine Le Pen is set to win the first round of the French presidential election on April 23rd, as polls confirm the death of French conservatism. While Mme Le Pen is likely to lose the decisive second round to ‘centrist’ candidate and former Rothschild banker Emmanuel Macron, time is on her side: French voters’ resistance to globalisation spells long term victory for the FN.

Today’s Observer reports from ‘forgotten France’, the Yonne area south of Paris, typical of the areas where the FN is registering strong support among young voters.  Nor is this restricted to the ‘underclass’: there are now growing FN branches inside elite universities.

The latest polls suggest that the candidate of neo-Thatcherite conservatism – former Prime Minister François Fillon – might slip to fourth place, defeated not only by Le Pen and Macron but by extreme-left candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon, who has been the dark horse of the campaign in the past fortnight.  In fact if the extreme-left had been able to unite behind a single candidate, the second round would probably have seen Le Pen v Mélenchon rather than Le Pen v Macron.

Arguably French politics should no longer be seen as Left v Right, but rather as Globalist v Nationalist.

Just over half of French voters remain wedded to their national traditions, against the chill winds of deracinated globalism. But this majority is itself evenly split between those who have opted for Le Pen’s FN and those who remain with some variety of 20th century leftism.

The traditionalist majority is opposed by a globalist minority – but most do not wish to face the full brutal logic of globalism, represented by Fillon’s policies of Thatcher-style cuts and deregulation, which would make France more like the UK or even the USA. It doesn’t help their cause when Fillon himself – while preaching austerity and state cutbacks for other Frenchmen – is found to have been profiting outrageously (and perhaps illegally) from lavish state payments to his wife for non-jobs!

Nationalist candidates in this year’s elections

ballot box

 

Following our article on election nominations earlier this week, we can confirm the following candidates are standing for nationalist parties at county council and other elections on May 4th.

BNP – 12 candidates

Essex
Halstead – Paul Hooks
Heybridge & Tollesbury – Richard Perry
Maldon – Trevor Cable
Pitsea (2 vacancies) – Paul Borg and Christine Winter

Kent
Dartford NE – Ronald Ball
Dartford W – Michael Cope
Swanley – Cliff Le May

Hampshire
Hayling Island – John Moore

Lancashire
Nelson E – John Rowe
Pendle C – Brian Parker

Lincolnshire
Louth S – Robert Ashton


National Front – 4 candidates

Aberdeen
Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen – Dave MacDonald
Torry & Ferryhill – Billy Watson

Bridgend
Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd – Adam Lloyd

Lancashire
Whitworth & Bacup – Kevin Bryan


English Democrats – 4 candidates (we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Bury
Besses (by-election) – Steve Morris

Cambridgeshire & Peterborough
Mayoral election – Stephen Goldspink

Essex
Ongar & Rural – Robin Tilbrook

Greater Manchester
Mayoral election – Steve Morris


British Resistance – 2 candidates

Worcestershire
Gorse Hill & Warndon – Linda Bell
Nunnery – Carl Mason


British Democratic Party

Leicestershire
Loughborough S – Kevan Stafford


Patria

West Sussex
Chichester W – Dr Andrew Emerson
(also contesting a simultaneous borough by-election in East Wittering, Chichester)


Independent

Durham
Spennymoor – Pete Molloy

 

The Trump mystery is over

One of 59 Tomahawk Cruise missiles launched from US ships in the Red Sea attacking Syria today

One of 59 Tomahawk Cruise missiles launched from US ships in the Red Sea attacking Syria today

So now we know.

At the cost of many lives, with infinite destruction still to come, the USA has today demonstrated that Donald Trump’s victory changed nothing in terms of Washington foreign policy – except to make it much worse than Obama’s and probably about as bad as Hillary’s would have been.
A couple of days ago Steve Bannon (the closest thing to an ‘Alt Right’ voice in the Trump White House) was peremptorily removed from the National Security Council, after reported clashes with Trump’s influential Jewish son-in-law Jared Kushner.
Now we know why.
Today’s US airstrikes in Syria were rightly condemned by Russian prime minister Medvedev.  It shows the extraordinary times we live in that many H&D readers will agree with the Kremlin rather than with a supposedly ‘far right’ White House.
Medvedev wrote a few minutes ago:

“Nobody is overestimating the value of pre-election promises but there must be limits of decency. Beyond that is absolute mistrust. Which is really sad for our now completely ruined relations. And which is good news for terrorists.

“One more thing. This military action is a clear indication of the US president’s extreme dependency on the opinion of the Washington establishment, the one that the new president strongly criticised in his inauguration speech. Soon after his victory, I noted that everything would depend on how soon Trump’s election promises would be broken by the existing power machine. It took only two and a half months.”

Former Trump supporter Ann Coulter was equally dismayed:

“Those who wanted us meddling in the Middle East voted for other candidates.

“Trump campaigned on not getting involved in Mideast. Said it always helps our enemies & creates more refugees. Then he saw a picture on TV.”

Trump’s horrific blunder demonstrates one problem with “outsiders”, especially businessmen, getting involved in politics – vanity and an addiction to quick-fix solutions.

Former Lib Dem candidate joins Galloway campaign

Leading Liberal Democrat Qassim Afzal endorses Gorton candidate George Galloway

Leading Liberal Democrat Qassim Afzal endorses Gorton candidate George Galloway

Qassim Afzal – who was Liberal Democrat candidate for Manchester Gorton in 2005 and 2010, and a member of the party’s federal executive – has quit and endorsed George Galloway, the former MP and independent candidate for the Manchester Gorton by-election on May 4th.

Mr Afzal is a wealthy businessman who had been hoping to become Lib Dem candidate for the by-election, and some of his former colleagues are suggesting sour grapes after the party opted instead for ex-councillor Jackie Pearcey.

Reports on the ground in Manchester indicate that the Lib Dems are attracting significant support from white voters in Gorton, but have effectively given up on the Asian vote after Labour selected Afzal Khan, boss of the local Pakistani electoral machine. It is interesting that not a single Asian name appears on Ms Pearcey’s nomination papers: something to which a professional political party like the Lib Dems gives careful thought.

Labour is almost certain to win the by-election on May 4th, but there could now be a close battle for second place between Galloway and the Lib Dems.

BNP boosted by UKIP’s disappearance in Pendle

ballot-boxes-460_1418302c

Nominations closed on Tuesday for various local elections being held across most of the UK (except London) on May 4th.

As expected there will be very few candidates from traditional nationalist parties, with most interest focused on just how far UKIP declines. In several (especially northern) counties UKIP have lost about half of their candidates.

For example, we now know that UKIP will have 36 candidates in Lancashire this year, compared to 63 last time; similarly in Cumbria the UKIP candidate list is down from 52 to 23; in North Yorkshire down from 48 to 24; in Durham down from 31 to 14; and in Derbyshire down from 54 to 38.  Further south and east the party has more candidates, though weaker in the South West: down from 48 to 24 in Somerset and from 77 to 21 in Cornwall. The biggest decline is in Wiltshire, where UKIP had 54 candidates last time, but only 8 this year.

One early surprise is in Pendle (part of Lancashire County Council) where the BNP will have two candidates, neither of them opposed by UKIP. Long-serving borough councillor Brian Parker faces Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat opponents in the Pendle Central division, while his colleague John Rowe has only Labour and Conservative opponents (both Asian) in Nelson East.

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

 

 

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

Kevan Stafford of the British Democrats will contest the Loughborough South division of Leicestershire, his party’s sole candidate.

The National Front will have four candidates across the UK: chairman Kevin Bryan is standing in the Whitworth & Bacup division of Lancashire. Unfortunately (like Mr Stafford of the Brit Dems) he has UKIP opposition.

Dave MacDonald (Mr Bryan’s successor as NF chairman) is contesting the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen City Council.  Mr MacDonald is of course already an elected community councillor in the Aberdeen suburb of Garthdee. Also in Aberdeen, the NF’s Billy Watson is contesting the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

Mr MacDonald’s former deputy Adam Lloyd is NF candidate for Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd ward, Bridgend.

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Three BNP candidates are standing in Kent: former GLA candidate Cliff Le May in Swanley; Ronald Ball in Dartford NE; and Michael Cope in Dartford West.  Mr Le May is the only one without UKIP opposition: bearing in mind UKIP polled almost 20% in Swanley four years ago, he will be hopeful of a good result in their absence.

There are five BNP candidates in Essex (compared to 14 in 2013 and 75 in 2009): former Braintree parliamentary candidate Paul Hooks in Halstead; Paul Borg and Christine Winter in the two-councillor Pitsea division; Richard Perry in Heybridge & Tollesbury; and Trevor Cable in Maldon. The latter two are standing under the label Fighting Unsustainable Housing Because We Care (which the party has successfully used to win parish council seats in the past without mentioning the BNP name).  We don’t yet know whether this time the name BNP will appear on the ballot paper in these two divisions.

British Resistance (the party founded by supporters of ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate Jack Sen) have two candidates in Worcestershire: former BNP organiser Carl Mason in Nunnery; and Linda Bell in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Former BNP parliamentary candidate Dr Andrew Emerson is Patria candidate for the Chichester West division of West Sussex. Dr Emerson is also contesting a borough council by-election on the same day in East Wittering ward, Chichester.

Robin Tilbrook - is the ED party over?

Robin Tilbrook – is the ED party over?

Following the imprisonment of former party official Steve Uncles for election fraud, English Democrats candidates are notable by their absence. There are no ED candidates in the former stronghold Doncaster – which has an all-out council and mayoral election this year with no ED presence. So far we only know about party leader Robin Tilbrook, standing in his local Essex division Ongar & Rural, plus ED mayoral candidates Steve Morris in Greater Manchester and Stephen Goldspink in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. Steve Morris is also contesting a by-election in Besses ward, Bury.

Robert Ashton is BNP candidate for the Louth South division of Lincolnshire, while John Moore is contesting the Hayling Island division of Hampshire.

Former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy is standing as an independent in the Spennymoor division of Durham (technically a unitary authority rather than a county council). Despite this being the home of party leader Adam Walker, there are no BNP candidates in Durham, nor in Cumbria where the party’s head office is located.

Further news of candidates and campaigns will be posted as we get it. So far H&D believes that the BNP has 12 county council candidates in total, compared to 92 at the last county elections in 2013.

According to H&D‘s (unofficial) calculation, UKIP have 1,037 candidates for the county councils this year: that’s down from 1,494 last time. There are also six unitary authorities that are directly comparable, having elections both in 2013 and this year.  In those six councils combined, UKIP has 85 candidates this year, compared to 242 last time.

There has been a real UKIP collapse in three unitary council areas – Cornwall (from 77 candidates to 21), Wiltshire (from 54 to 8), and Shropshire (from 29 to 9).
By contrast in several South Eastern or Eastern counties UKIP has maintained pretty solid slates: 69 in Kent, 60 in West Sussex, 59 in Essex, 57 in Surrey and 54 in Norfolk.
NOTE: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy was at one time briefly a member of British Voice. We apologise for this error.

Next Page »

  • Find By Category

  • Latest News