Dying UKIP ousts leader

Henry Bolton (left) – ousted UKIP leader – with the party’s only successful chief Nigel Farage

On Thursday UKIP lost yet another council seat, today the dying party voted to oust its leader Henry Bolton, who has been brought down by multiple scandals. The vote at an emergency UKIP conference this afternoon went 867-500 against Bolton.

UKIP’s real problem is a combination of poor quality officials and a confused identity.  To what extent is it a nationalist party?  Is it at all racially conscious?  Does it even oppose immigration?  Is it Thatcherite (even ultra-Thatcherite or US-style libertarian) or does it seek to capture some of the spirit and electoral base of the old Labour Party?

None of these questions will be resolved today by the vote to remove Henry Bolton.  In fact Bolton himself may refuse to go quietly, but he is now so discredited that it seems impossible for Nigel Farage and Arron Banks to use him in their longstanding plan to overturn UKIP’s constitution.

Farage and Banks had aimed to reduce the power of UKIP’s National Executive and concentrate power in the leader’s office – what some have unkindly called a BNP-style, führer-principle constitution (though of course without BNP policies)!

David Kurten, likely to be UKIP’s next leader

Now the most likely outcome is for UKIP’s rump to select either half-caste London Assembly member David Kurten, or half-Turkish MEP Tim Aker, as the next (perhaps last?) captain of the sinking ship.  Meanwhile Farage and Banks will go off to form a new pressure group (probably not a party) in favour of “Hard Brexit”, while Anne-Marie Waters will continue her chaotic attempt to forge a new party out of UKIP dissidents and ex-EDL types.

Many disillusioned UKIP members have already voted with their feet and wallets, rejoining the Conservative Party where they hope to elect Jacob Rees-Mogg as the next Tory leader, succeeding hopeless Prime Minister Theresa May.  Yet despite his new status as bookies’ favourite, Rees-Mogg is unlikely to make it as far as the members’ ballot, and will probably strike a deal with Boris Johnson or Michael Gove.

Will all this eventually leave political space for revival of a serious racial nationalist party?

Canadians protest at German Consulate after violinist arrested for Thought Crime

Last week a group of concerned Canadians deliver a letter of protest at the German Consulate in Vancouver, following the extraordinary arrest of a Canadian violinist for violating Germany’s notorious laws restricting historical analysis and debate.

Violinist Monica Schaefer was seized by German police while quietly attending the trial of attorney Sylvia Stolz, who has been subjected to repeated prosecutions and imprisonments for defending her historical revisionist clients in German courts.

Now Monika herself is being held in prison while the authorities determine how she can be tried.  Despite her good character, she is likely to remain in custody for several months before any trial.

Germany’s notorious volksverhetzung law makes it a criminal offence to raise questions about the alleged ‘Holocaust’ of six million Jews in homicidal ‘gas chambers’.  Those imprisoned under this law have included German-Canadian artist and publisher Ernst Zündel, author and lawyer Horst Mahler, and his fellow attorney Sylvia Stolz.

For further information about Monika Schaefer’s case read Paul Fromm’s regularly updated website.

H&D readers can contact Monika Schaefer at her prison address:

Monika Schaefer, Political Prisoner,

Stadelheim Prison

Schwarzenbergstr. 14

81549 München

Germany

UKIP’s death spiral – councillors in mass resignation

Latest UKIP MEP to quit is Tim Aker (above right), seen here campaigning with Nigel Farage in Thurrock, where the entire UKIP group has walked out.

The latest twist in the slow death of UKIP has seen mass resignations in two of the party’s few remaining strongholds. Two MEPs have left the party in the past week, which has led to entire blocs of councillors also quitting.

All seventeen UKIP councillors in the Essex borough of Thurrock (who had been the main opposition to the Tories on the council) resigned yesterday, including Eastern England MEP and former Thurrock parliamentary candidate Tim Aker. They have formed a new group called ‘Thurrock Independents’.

Meanwhile five of the six UKIP councillors in Hartlepool, which had been the party’s only growth area in the 18 months since the Brexit referendum, have also walked out, joined by the MEP for NE England and former UKIP leadership candidate Jonathan Arnott.

Significantly UKIP’s latest leadership crisis – with Henry Bolton refusing to quit despite a no confidence vote by his entire party executive – does not seem to have boosted the breakaway party set up by Anne-Marie Waters, the Islam obsessed runner-up to Bolton in last year’s leadership contest. After their first application was rejected by the Electoral Commission, this new outfit is still not registered as a political party: it now hopes to use the name ‘For Britain Movement’.

Henry Bolton (above left) – the latest catastrophic UKIP leader – with Nigel Farage

Rather than Waters and her ex-EDL associate ‘Tommy Robinson’, the short-term beneficiaries of UKIP’s collapse might be Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks, though they are likely to build a cross-party movement out of UKIP’s ruins rather than a new party, and it would be focused merely on securing Brexit.

The tragedy is that the broadly nationalist views held by a very large percentage of British voters now have no credible electoral voice. Both UKIP and the BNP have effectively died, and for the time being the only widely-heard spokesmen for any sort of nationalist or even vaguely patriotic politics are cranks or charlatans.

 

Arlene Foster speaks for UK after May’s blunders

As Prime Minister Theresa May blunders through another day of chaotic Brexit negotiations, it has been left to Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party, to stand up for the principles once understood by every member of May’s Conservative & Unionist Party.

Mrs Foster today made clear:
“Northern Ireland must leave the EU on the same terms as the rest of the United Kingdom. We will not accept any form of regulatory divergence which separates Northern Ireland economically or politically from the rest of the United Kingdom. The economic and constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom will not be compromised in any way.”

How on earth could a Conservative Prime Minister have allowed herself to be drawn into a position where that “economic and constitutional integrity” could be questioned in the slightest degree?

What part of the words “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland” does the Prime Minister fail to comprehend?

Too many Tories have been relying on the complacent assumption that DUP MPs will continue to support the government at Westminster (despite every provocation and betrayal) because they cannot possibly risk a Jeremy Corbyn government.

It’s time for the DUP (and any remaining genuine Tory patriots) to call that bluff.

Lest we forget

Representatives of two now defunct nationalist parties – the British Peoples Party and the England First Party – lay wreaths at the War Memorial in Darwen, Lancashire, on Remembrance Day 2006. Delegates included veteran nationalist Eddy Morrison (front row, far left) and then EFP councillors Mark Cotterill and Michael Johnson.

For the last three years Remembrance Day activities have had a special resonance, marking the centenary of the First World War and its many tragic episodes.

The last week has seen the centenary of two interconnected and far-reaching events which would never have occurred had this European Civil War never started – the Bolshevik Revolution and the Balfour Declaration which laid the foundations for seventy years of Soviet tyranny and (so far) almost seventy years of Zionist oppression in Palestine.

On Armistice Day – November 11th 1918 – the mother of Wilfred Owen, a 25-year-old second lieutenant in the Manchester Regiment, was informed that her son had been killed in action seven days earlier. Owen – now regarded as the leading poet of the war – was killed at the head of a raiding party crossing the Sambre-Oise Canal in northern France.  This was one of the last British “victories” of the war.

As we reflect on the cost of “victory” in the two disastrous European civil wars of the 20th century we remember Wilfred Owen’s posthumously published lines:

If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori.

The late Ralph Hebden, friend and comrade of the H&D team, on active service in Afghanistan with 45 Commando, Royal Marines.

As in previous years the National Front will march to the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Day, Sunday 12th November.  The parade will assemble at 1.15 pm on Bressenden Place, opposite Victoria railway station, and march off to the Cenotaph at 1.45 pm.  Following the wreath laying ceremony there will be an open air rally nearby, with the event set to conclude around 3.30 pm.

All nationalists are welcome to join the NF’s Remembrance Day commemoration, irrespective of party.

Minister faces sack over secret Israeli meetings

Priti Patel with leading pro-Israel lobbyist Sir Stuart Polak (right) during her visit to Israel in August

Priti Patel – the minister in charge of Britain’s overseas aid budget as Secretary of State for International Development – is expected to be sacked within hours after attempting to deceive journalists about a series of secret meetings with Israeli ministers and officials, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Some of these meetings involved plans to pay Britain’s overseas aid via the Israeli army.

Ms Patel breached diplomatic protocol by visiting Israeli occupied territory on the Golan Heights as a guest of the government. Britain and most other countries do not officially recognised Israeli control of the Golan, and Ms Patel compounded her offence by suggesting on her return to Britain that our government should provide funds for the Israeli field hospital in the occupied territory.

Former British ambassador Sir Christopher Meyer expressed the astonishment of the diplomatic community:
“What did she think she was doing? Incomprehensibly daft.”

It seems that Ms Patel believed both that she herself was untouchable, as the daughter of Ugandan Asian immigrants and a valuable symbol for her pro-Brexit, neo-Thatcherite wing of the Tory party, and that she was effectively representing the Prime Minister’s pro-Israel instincts, against the more evenhanded approach of the Foreign Office.

Stephen Pollard of the Jewish Chronicle has an exclusive story this morning stating that Ms Patel’s ultimate offence – not revealing two of her secret meetings even in her latest press statement after the scandal broke – was actually sanctioned by the Prime Minister’s office. Number 10 (according to Mr Pollard’s sources) asked Ms Patel to keep these meetings secret so as not to embarrass the Foreign Office.

Today’s Tory establishment couldn’t have chosen a better way to mark this week’s centenary of the Balfour Declaration. They have established that 100 years on their party’s relationship with Zionism remains steeped in dishonour.

London Forum organiser charged under Race Act

Jez Turner during his anti-Shomrim speech in 2015

Jez Turner – organiser of the London Forum – has been charged with “inciting racial hatred” in connection with his speech at the “Anti-Shomrim” rally in Whitehall on 4th July 2015.

The Zionist lobby group “Campaign Against Anti-Semitism” had brought a legal action to force the Crown Prosecution Service to bring charges against Mr Turner, even though the CPS had originally decided he committed no offence.

An initial hearing will be held at 1.30 pm on Monday 30th October at Westminster Magistrates Court, Marylebone.

Meanwhile another prosecution instigated by the CAA sees anti-Zionist folk singer Alison Chabloz facing charges under the Communications Act, relating to songs uploaded to YouTube. A full day’s hearing of this case will take place at the same Marylebone court on October 25th at 10 am.

Ms Chabloz was arrested again last Wednesday and subjected to an extraordinary 48 hours of custody including travel from London to Derbyshire, following alleged breach of bail conditions.

While we are restricted in reporting these cases at the present stage of proceedings, there will be full updates in forthcoming editions of H&D.

Stasi state targets British nationalists

Alex Davies of National Action, speaking at H&D’s 2014 John Tyndall Memorial Meeting in Preston

East Germany’s notorious Stasi – the political police – ceased to exist soon after the Berlin Wall came down in 1989 and the ‘German Democratic Republic’ disappeared into the dustbin of history.

Yet Stasi style policing is with us in Britain today, in the form of the ‘Terrorism Act’ that bans political groups, regardless of whether any ‘terrorist’ crimes have been committed or planned.

Last year Tory Home Secretary Amber Rudd banned the national-socialist youth group National Action. Former NA activist Jack Renshaw is in Preston prison on remand, awaiting charges for alleged membership of a ‘terrorist’ group; several serving British soldiers were arrested for alleged NA membership a few weeks ago in a still mysterious case; and this week several individuals seen as the former leaders of NA were similarly arrested, though not yet charged.

Now the ban has been extended to cover two alleged aliases for NA: Scottish Dawn and NS131. Under the Terrorism Act this latest action is unnecessary, as the law already forbids any attempt to restart a banned organisation under a new alias, but the new banning orders are probably a ‘belt and braces’ policy – a similar approach was taken in issuing extra bans for numerous aliases of the Islamist group Al-Muhajiroun.

The question remains whether this is the start of a wider crack down on the so-called ‘far right’, or whether it is a cosmetic exercise by the Home Office. Government experts must be well aware that a widespread crackdown on Islamism, including many banning orders and possible internment without trial, is likely – so it might seem politic to lock up a few White nationalists as well.

 

Pro-Farage candidate wins UKIP leadership

Henry Bolton (left) – winner of the UKIP leadership race – with Nigel Farage

Despite all the hype, UKIP’s small-c conservative membership eventually voted for the most obviously “respectable” leadership candidate.

Former intelligence officer Henry Bolton was today elected UKIP leader with 3,874 votes (29.9%), ahead of the anti-Islam campaigner Anne Marie Waters on 2,755 (21.3%). The party’s peculiar first-past-the-post, single ballot system – and the fact that there were seven candidates on the ballot paper, six of whom had a serious chance – meant it was always likely that the winner would have less than one third of the membership’s support.

Turnout was only 46.6%, reflecting the fact that many of those nominally listed as party members (and entitled to vote) have already quit UKIP and had no interest in its leadership contest.

Bolton had warned that a victory for Waters and her EDL backers would risk UKIP becoming some form of “nazi party”. He will now claim a clear mandate, since the two most obvious anti-Islam candidates (Ms Waters and GLA member Peter Whittle) had only 32.2% between them, so even with a transferable vote Ms Waters would not have won.

Mixed-race GLA member David Kurten finished third with 2,201 votes (17.0%); Welsh businessman and libertarian John Rees-Evans fourth on 2,021 (15.6%); original bookies’ favourite Peter Whittle fifth on 1,413 (10.9%), after much of his support drained to Ms Waters; Rotherham parliamentary candidate Jane Collins a surprisingly poor sixth on 566 (4.4%) despite having been backed by two former rival candidates who withdrew in her favour; and space-travel enthusiast Aidan Powlesland seventh on 85 (0.65%).

All eyes now are on Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks, who had plans to launch a new breakaway movement within days if Waters or Whittle were elected. Their decision may now depend on whether Henry Bolton is able to secure constitutional changes reducing the role of the party’s executive and enhancing the leadership’s power.

UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters (left) promoting the UK launch of anti-Islam group PEGIDA alongside the EDL founder Tommy Robinson (centre) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston

The most likely short-term breakaway is now from the other side of the party: Anne Marie Waters and her Islam-obsessed faction.

One of Ms Waters’s leading allies, Paul Weston of Liberty GB, reacted badly to the result, tweeting: “UKIP needed a revolutionary leader, instead it got Mr Establishment Henry Bolton OBE who will do nothing whatsoever about Islam.”

Another close Waters associate, EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias Tommy Robinson), similarly commented: “UKIP are now irrelevant when it comes to the biggest threat our country faces. We need a political voice to oppose Islam like Wilders & Le Pen.”

By contrast third-placed David Kurten and fellow candidate Jane Collins were quick to tweet their loyalty to the new leader.

H&D will have a fuller report on the UKIP contest later this weekend, and a detailed analysis in issue 81 of what these developments mean for the British nationalist movement.

AfD tries to shrug off leadership split after record gains

AfD co-leader Frauke Petry walked out of her party’s press conference this morning: she will sit as an independent

Only a few hours after achieving record gains in the German general election, the anti-immigration party Alternative for Germany (AfD – Alternative for Deutschland) had its first setback.

Co-leader Frauke Petry stunned a press conference this morning by announcing she was quitting to sit as an independent in Germany’s parliament, the Bundestag.  Mrs Petry then walked out, refusing to answer any questions.

This is partly the old story of ego overtaking party commitment. Mrs Petry rapidly became the best known public face of AfD after ousting the party’s founder Bernd Lucke in July 2015, and she might have started to believe she was bigger than the party.

Commentators also need to be more careful in referring to ‘moderate’ and ‘hardline’ factions in AfD. Mrs Petry herself was considered an ‘extremist’ when her faction took over the party two years ago.  Most of AfD’s founders had been interested mainly in reforming the EU, and were a very moderate version of UKIP. Mrs Petry and her allies were unafraid of using hardline anti-immigration rhetoric.

This paid off as German voters revolted against conservative Chancellor Angela Merkel’s open door policy on ‘asylum seekers’.  At one stage AfD was polling close to 20% and began winning seats in regional parliaments (Landtag) across Germany.

AfD’s candidate for Chancellor, 72-year-old former CDU official Alexander Gauland (right) was unimpressed by Mrs Petry’s behaviour this morning

However Mrs Petry – while happy to use extreme language about immigration and especially about Islam – was very nervous about offending Germany’s small but noisy Jewish population, and wanted to avoid challenging taboo subjects connected to her country’s 20th century history.

Last year she refused to join the witch-hunting of AfD activist Wolfgang Gedeon for his historical views, but we can now see that this was more about her personal rivalry with Gedeon’s arch-critic Jörg Meuthen. Today it is Mrs Petry who styles herself the ‘moderate’, and Mr Meuthen who remains loyal to the party leadership.

Notably she refused to back the leader of anti-Islam group Pegida when he proposed that circumcision of children should be banned until they reach 18 and can decide for themselves. AfD’s draft manifesto in 2016 supported this policy, but Mrs Petry and her allies blocked it, realising that the policy would be seen as anti-Jewish as well as anti-Muslim.

In April 2017 she told German newspaper Die Welt that her party “is one of the few political guarantors of Jewish life, also in times of illegal, anti-Semitic migration to Germany”.

Thuringia Landtag member Bjorn Höcke (centre), one of AfD’s most prominent spokesmen, seen here with Alexander Gauland and Frauke Petry, who later tried to have Höcke expelled from the party

By this time Mrs Petry was engaged in an internal battle within the party to enforce a policy of genuflecting to the national religion of ‘Holocaustianity’. She tried to get one party official, Bjorn Höcke, expelled from AfD – not for ‘Holocaust denial’, but for a speech in which he called the Berlin Holocaust memorial a “monument of shame”, and an interview in which he told the Wall Street Journal: “The big problem is that one presents Hitler as absolutely evil. But of course we know that there is no black and no white in history.”

After failing to enforce a rigid party discipline on such matters, and partly because she was expecting her fifth child, Mrs Petry stepped down earlier this year as AfD’s candidate for Chancellor.  In July there was even a serious attempt to block her from standing as a party candidate for the Bundestag, partly because of her “divisive” behavious but also because she face criminal charges for alleged perjury, connected with the running and financing of AfD in her home region of Saxony.

Even during the election campaign Mrs Petry was seen as a troublemaker, particularly hostile to party co-founder Alexander Gauland, the 72-year-old candidate for Chancellor, who upset her by referring to fellow Germans’ “right to be proud of the achievements of the German soldiers in two world wars.”

AfD’s leading candidates at the Bundestag election – Alexander Gauland and Alice Weidel – celebrating their record high vote last night

At this morning’s press conference Mrs Petry did not expand on her reasons for quitting the party.  She seems to have the backing of a small faction in the north-eastern state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, where four fellow MPs elected yesterday as AfD candidates say they will also now sit as independents.

However the vast majority of the party is likely to view this morning’s outburst as petty and divisive, motivated by personal spite and vanity.  Mrs Petry has almost certainly consigned herself to political oblivion.  In particular it is difficult for her to sustain the argument that her line is the only “pragmatic” one, after AfD has just secured the best election result it could reasonably have hoped for.

AfD achieved 5.9 million votes (12.6%) and will have 94 seats in the new Bundestag. This is up from 2 million votes (4.7%) at the last general election in 2013, when the party fell just below the 5% threshold so had no seats. AfD’s results were especially outstanding in parts of the former East Germany – becoming the largest party in the region of Saxony (which includes the cities of Leipzig, Dresden and Chemnitz). AfD polled almost 670,000 votes (27.0%) in Saxony, ahead of Merkel’s CDU on 26.9%.

AfD activists celebrating at their election night party

One unfortunate side-effect of AfD’s success is that the vote for Germany’s traditional nationalist party the NPD fell to 176,715 (0.4%), from 560,828 (1.3%) in 2013. Therefore the NPD has fallen below the 0.5% required for state funding, which would be a serious financial blow were it not for the fact that the Bundestag had already voted three months ago to cut off state funding of the NPD even if it qualified!

The best NPD constituency result was 2.0% in a Mecklenburg-Vorpommern district close to the Polish border in the far north-east; the party also managed 1.9% in several constituencies in Thuringia and Saxony. NPD polled 1.1% (28,434 votes) in Saxony as a whole, and 1.2% in Thuringia.

 

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