Dying UKIP prepares for leadership contest

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

The United Kingdon Independence Party continues its recent record of embarrassment, stumbling around in search of credible leadership, following last week’s disastrous General Election results.

Today David Coburn, UKIP’s sole MEP in Scotland announced that he would contest the leadership vacated on Friday by Paul Nuttall, who had been in the top job for just over six months. Mr Coburn is an ally of former leader Nigel Farage, and has said that if Farage decides to return he will not stand against him.

On the same day that he expressed his interest in the party leadership, Mr Coburn (who is openly homosexual) received unwelcome publicity in the Daily Record, Scotland’s best-selling newspaper.

The Record published its investigation of Scottish Dawn, described as successor to the nationalist youth movement National Action which is banned under the Terrorism Act.

Today's Daily Record front page

Today’s Daily Record front page

Ruaidhri McKim (a Scottish Dawn activist) was secretly filmed discussing his links to National Action and the Polish nationalist organisation NOP, as well as his membership of UKIP.  Mr McKim said:
I was in UKIP for a while. Then after Brexit I just left because I didn’t see a point in it anymore. There’s lots of radical people within it, but no one with any position is a radical. UKIP Scotland was fucked man. I’ve been drunk with David Coburn – he’s really good fun. He’s a fun guy.

Mr Coburn commented:
I think this chap is grandstanding and blethering and I am surprised you are taking him remotely seriously. I am homosexual, speak Arabic and various other languages and I have spent my entire life fighting ignorance, racial and sexual intolerance. Print this crap and I will sue this individual, you and your organ.

As UKIP continues to flounder, the ugly face of British Conservatism was exposed today when it emerged that the managing director of Jennings Racing (Britain’s largest independent bookmaking chain which trades under the name Jenningsbet) had emailed 500 staff before polling day warning them that only the Conservative Party would resist gambling reforms.

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

Labour and the Liberal Democrats had proposed reducing the maximum stake on the notorious fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) from £100 to £2.  FOBTs are notorious for fleecing gambling addicts who pump the entire contents of their wallets and purses into these terminals which have proliferated on British high streets.

Jenningsbet has 400 terminals spread across 100 high street shops.  Each machine brings in an average of £53,000 per year, with Britain’s gambling addicts losing a record £1.8bn on FOBTs in the year to last September. Jenningsbet is co-owned by three Jewish brothers, the Pears family whose ancestor changed his name from Schleicher on arriving in Britain from Austria in the 19th century.

The Pears family are noted for their philanthropy to Jewish charities and Holocaust education, having established the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck College, London.

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories woulod resist reform of gambling laws

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories would resist reform of gambling laws

 

Setback for Le Pen in French Assembly election


Marine-Le-Pen 2017

A month after her defeat in the French Presidential election (where she had been only the second FN candidate ever to reach the second round run-off) Marine Le Pen’s National Front (FN) had disappointing results yesterday in the first round of parliamentary elections to the French National Assembly.

The FN polled just under 3 million votes (13.2%), down from 3.5m (13.6%) at the previous Assembly election in 2012, and 7.7m (21.3%) in the presidential first round just seven weeks ago.

One feature of yesterday’s election was a sharp drop in turnout, down to 48.7% from 57.2% in 2012.  Indeed before 2012 even these Assembly elections always had turnouts over 60%: in the 1980s and earlier turnout was over 70%.

This widespread disillusionment with the political process is not a strong foundation for the new French President, former Rothschild banker turned ‘centrist’ politician Emmanuel Macron, whose new party En Marche! seems set for a landslide victory in next week’s second round.

The new party formed by President Emmanuel Macron is set for a landslide majority in the French Assembly.

The new party formed by President Emmanuel Macron is set for a landslide majority in the French Assembly.

Macron’s manifesto is bland and vacuous even by modern political standards, so once in office he is bound to alienate some sections of his present support.

Marine Le Pen correctly points out that the two-round system is heavily biased against her party, unlike the proportional voting used in 1986, which allowed her father Jean-Marie Le Pen and his supporters to win 35 Assembly seats.  In 2012 the FN took only two seats, having had none in 2007 and only one member re-elected in 1988, 1993, 1997 and 2002.

Normally the top two candidates in the first round progress into next week’s run-off (though in a handful of cases either one candidate will be elected immediately by winning a majority of the electorate in the first ballot; or a third candidate will qualify for the second-round by managing 12.5% or more of the electorate in the first-round – note these percentages relate to the electorate, not merely those who turn out – so they are high hurdles to jump.)

In 2012 the two FN Assembly winners were both in southern France. Marion Maréchal Le Pen (the leader’s niece) was elected last time aged 22, but temporarily stepped aside from politics before this year’s election, partly due to differences with her aunt.  She clearly disagreed with some of the party’s present direction, being both more socially conservative than Marine on issues such as same-sex marriage; more traditionally ‘hardline’ on racial/religious/immigration questions; less interested in appeasing international Zionism; and less concerned with pursuing quasi-socialist appeals to working-class voters.

27-year-old Marion Maréchal Le Pen, seen here with her grandfather FN founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, stood down at this election and is temporarily withdrawing from politics after disagreements with her aunt Marine Le Pen.

27-year-old Marion Maréchal Le Pen, seen here with her grandfather FN founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, stood down at this election and is temporarily withdrawing from politics after disagreements with her aunt Marine Le Pen.

Marion Maréchal’s Vaucluse constituency was in a prosperous region of South West France, contrasting with her aunt’s working-class power base in the far north. Her successor Hervé de Lépinau finished second with 31.8%, qualifying for next week’s second round but faces a tough battle with En Marche! candidate Brune Poirson, who topped the first round with 32.1%.

Similarly the FN’s other 2012 victor – barrister and Marine Le Pen loyalist Gilbert Collard – has a tough second round after narrowly topping the poll with 32.3%. His second-round opponent is female ex-bullfighter Marie Sara, one of several celebrity candidates for En Marche!, who took 32.2% in the first round.

One of the FN's two Assembly winners in 2012 – Gilbert Collard – is likely to lose his seat in the Gard region of the far south (part of the area once known as Languedoc).

One of the FN’s two Assembly winners in 2012 – Gilbert Collard – is likely to lose his seat in the Gard region of the far south (part of the area once known as Languedoc).

Marine Le Pen herself easily won the first round with 46.0% in her constituency near Calais, but even here she is not absolutely guaranteed election if the left rallies behind her En Marche! opponent, since the FN has already taken almost all of the right-wing vote here: the mainstream conservatives polled only 4.2% and the UKIP-style party DLF just 0.8%.

The leader of DLF – former Farage ally Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, who reneged on a proposed parliamentary pact with the FN a few weeks ago – looks to be in trouble in his constituency, a prosperous suburb south of Paris which he has represented for 20 years. He finished second with 29.8%, behind En Marche! candidate Antoine Pavamani on 35.8%. Dupont-Aignan will struggle to survive in next week’s second round.

Nicolas Dupont-Aignan (right), seen here with his former ally Nigel Farage, is likely to lose his Assembly seat after reneging on a proposed pact with the FN.

Nicolas Dupont-Aignan (right), seen here with his former ally Nigel Farage, is likely to lose his Assembly seat after reneging on a proposed pact with the FN.

Sadly it now looks impossible for the FN to hit the important total of 15 National Assembly members, which would allow it to form an official parliamentary group with significant funding and guaranteed influence on important parliamentary committees. (In this respect the collapse of the deal with Dupont-Aignan might no longer be relevant, though it had been assumed that the latter’s support could be crucial in clearing the 15-seat hurdle.)

Though 118 FN candidates have qualified for next Sunday’s second round, a likely maximum target is ten Assembly seats, though they could easily slip to five or fewer: in which case (though this would still be the second-best parliamentary election in FN history) there will be serious questions within the party as to whether Marine Le Pen’s path of modernising and “de-demonisation” has been worth pursuing.

 

 

BNP and other nationalist votes

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and parliamentary candidate Brian Parker

An extraordinary General Election that wiped out Theresa May’s Conservative majority also saw the electoral eclipse of the BNP and the English Democrats, none of whose candidates even came close to saving their deposits.

Brian Parker – the BNP’s sole remaining borough councillor – polled only 718 votes (1.6%) in Pendle, his party’s main target seat.

BNP chairman Adam Walker managed a slightly better result in Bishop Auckland, but was bottom of the poll with 991 votes (2.3%).

Meanwhile the English Democrats’ results were even worse, collapsing from an already low base. As the SNP lost support north of the border it appears that the Union is safe, and logically ‘English’ nationalism has lost relevance.

BNP results

Bexleyheath & Crayford
Peter Finch 0.6%

Bishop Auckland
Adam Walker 2.3%

Charnwood
Stephen Denham 0.6% (-0.4)

Dagenham & Rainham
Paul Sturdy 0.5% (+0.2)

Eltham
John Clarke 1.6%

Hornchurch & Upminster
David Furness 0.7% (+0.3)

Maldon [listed as ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing’: BNP name not on ballot]
Richard Perry 0.5%

Old Bexley & Sidcup
Michael Jones 0.7% (+0.2)

Pendle
Brian Parker 1.6%

South Basildon & East Thurrock
Paul Borg 0.8%

——–

English Democrat candidates

Barnsley Central
Stephen Morris 0.5% (-0.8)

Barnsley East
Kevin Riddiough 0.7% (-0.4)

Bradford South
Thérèse Hirst 0.9%

Clacton
Robin Tilbrook 0.7%

Doncaster North
David Allen 0.9% (-0.3)

Holborn & St Pancras
Janus Polenceus 0.2%

NE Cambridgeshire
Stephen Goldspink 0.5%

Paul Nuttall (left) has succeeded Nigel Farage as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He claims that UKIP will serious challenge Labour in Northern England.

Paul Nuttall (left) succeeded Nigel Farage last year as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He resigned today after electoral humiliation,

Meanwhile those racial nationalists who believed that UKIP offered us some hope must think again after the party suffered a series of crushing defeats, ending with the resignation of humiliated leader Paul Nuttall.

Notable UKIP disasters included Clacton (formerly their sole parliamentary seat until Douglas Carswell’s resignation) where UKIP’s vote fell from 44.4% to 7.6%; Thanet South (where re-elected Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay still faces criminal charges for fraudulent overspending during his defeat of Nigel Farage in 2015) – UKIP vote down from 32.4% to 6.0%; and Boston & Skegness, a key target seat contested by Nuttall himself – UKIP vote down from 33.8% to 7.7%.

The only vaguely credible UKIP result came in Thurrock, where UKIP’s Tim Aker (an MEP from a part-Turkish background) fought a vigorous campaign against pro-Remain Tory MP Jackie Doyle-Price.  However even here the UKIP vote fell from 31.7% to 20.1%. Ms Doyle-Price survived, and Labour pushed UKIP into third place.

 

Tory gamble fails

ballot-boxes-460_1418302c

Early results have confirmed the H&D team’s suspicions that this UK general election would prove a personal disaster for Prime Minister Theresa May.

We shall tomorrow be publishing our analysis of what this means for the racial nationalist movement.  UKIP died today; the promise of “strong and stable” Tory rule has proved illusory. In fact Mrs May’s gamble has been arguably the most disastrous decision in the history of Western democracy. Only a handful of hardcore pro-Brexit constituencies in the Midlands shifted from Labour to Tory: MansfieldNE Derbyshire, Walsall North and Stoke South (the latter a former BNP stronghold where UKIP boosted the Tories by standing aside).

This has proved a disastrous election for the multi-racial, politically correct Scottish National Party, whose former leader Alex Salmond was among several casualties: in fact the only silver lining for the Conservatives is that they will gain several seats from the SNP.  Scottish independence is as dead as UKIP after tonight’s results.  The Union is safe.

Though this might seem an excellent result for Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour, racial nationalists should not despair.

Watch this space for developing news on an extraordinary election!

Meanwhile – sadly – this election confirmed the decline of our existing racial nationalist parties. Even in Pendle the BNP’s Brian Parker – his party’s last remaining borough councillor – managed only 1.6%, though he had no UKIP opponent.

2017 has definitively killed off Prime Minister May and two moribund parties: UKIP and the BNP.

Perhaps the best news of the election for H&D readers is that the Democratic Unionist Party emerges from this election greatly strengthened, with ten MPs in a (probably) hung parliament.

 

Corbyn is right: the war on terror isn’t working – but we should also drain the swamp

Corbyn - War on Terror speech

Amid predictable fake outrage from his Conservative opponents, Jeremy Corbyn – no friend of H&D! – has dared to tell the truth.  As election campaigning resumed today (following several days hiatus due to the terrorist bombing of a Manchester concert hall) the Labour leader said: “We must be brave enough to admit the war on terror is simply not working. We need a smarter way to reduce the threat from countries that nurture terrorists and generate terrorism.”

It seems likely that the Manchester atrocity was carried out by a suicide bomber of Libyan origin, linked to that country’s version of Islamic State. If so, then it emanates from a truly Orwellian swamp. British governments once allied themselves with the earlier local version of IS – the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group – in terrorist and assassination plots against that country’s former dictator Col. Gaddafi.

Then under Tony Blair we changed tack, and delivered our former Islamist allies to Libyan torturers collaborating in a worldwide ‘war on terror’.  Sir Mark Allen (former MI6 counterterrorism director) might still face criminal charges over his role in the kidnapping and torture of LIFG leader Abdul Hakim Belhaj, though the relevant ministers including Jack Straw have typically dodged their responsibility.

In 2011 under David Cameron there was another policy lurch: Libya’s Islamists (or at least some of them) became our allies again in the campaign to oust Gaddafi.  And now in the resultant post-Gaddafi chaos they are back to being the enemy.

David Shayler - Libya plot

All this would be mad enough: what makes it really crazy is that among the 57 varieties of alien immigrant thronging British cities are a large community of Libyans with personal and family ties to these very characters who were sometimes our allies, while at other times consigned to the torture chamber.

Foreign and defence policy has never had much space for morality.  One response to the slaughter of British children in Manchester (the opposite of Corbyn’s policy) might be to carry out a reciprocal slaughter in Libya, targeting the extended families and support networks of IS.

But – setting moral questions entirely aside – H&D readers should recognise that such a policy (whether aiming at deterrence or merely revenge) requires precisely targeted and pitiless brutality. In their prime the likes of Gaddafi or Syria’s Hafez al-Assad were capable of that – hence their regimes survived.  Does anyone really believe that Britain has the will (let alone the local knowledge) to follow such a policy to its logical conclusion, to take whatever the terrorists throw back at us and throw back more of the same, until eventually we supposedly crush them?

It’s not going to happen.

Aftermath of the IRA's Manchester bomb in 1996. This bomb's materials were supplied by Col. Gaddafi, sworn enemy of this week's Manchester terrorists.

Aftermath of the IRA’s Manchester bomb in 1996. This bomb’s materials were supplied by Col. Gaddafi, sworn enemy of this week’s Manchester terrorists.

So we are left with the logic of Corbyn’s alternative. Some form of new deal with the Islamic world. We can only hope this would be less hypocritical then the deal with an earlier generation of bombers who targeted Manchester.  Among this week’s many tragic ironies is that the bomb that devastated Manchester city centre in 1996, planted just a few yards away from the scene of this week’s carnage, was the work of IRA godfathers armed by Col. Gaddafi, the bitter enemy of this week’s suicide bomber and his family.

No one was ever charged over that 1996 Manchester bombing – except a journalist and a police officer who dared to name the main suspect, the IRA’s Declan McCann (then of Crossmaglen, Co Armagh). McCann was spared arrest for political reasons and has since moved south to Castleblayney, Co Monaghan: he owns a property empire with his brother John. His IRA commanders went on to form part of Northern Ireland’s government and shake hands with the Queen.

 

Corbyn of course has his own dishonourable record of IRA apologetics. And though his approach to today’s failed war on terror makes sense, there’s one aspect that Corbyn and his ilk will never admit. Alongside a reassessment of foreign policy must come a draining of the multi-ethnic swamp. We should return the teeming non-British masses of our towns and cities back to their countries of origin.

UPDATE: On tonight’s Channel 4 News, Theresa May’s Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon fell into a well-laid journalistic trap when he condemned what he thought were Jeremy Corbyn’s words about the war on terror, only to find they were the words of his senior Cabinet colleague, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson!  A more sympathetic journalist in The Spectator had earlier today offered the Tories some wise strategic advice on how to handle this issue: they failed to take it – and as another Spectator columnist Rod Liddle puts it, this is turning into the worst Tory election campaign on record.

Millwall and Blackburn fans contest election

Millwall - Willow Winston

An election that has been otherwise tedious (so far) is enlivened by two candidates representing fans of Millwall and Blackburn Rovers, contesting otherwise safe Labour constituencies.

In Lewisham East, the candidate is a 72-year-old female artist, Willow Winston: not exactly the Millwall stereotype! Her campaign is prompted by a very dodgy relationship between the local Labour establishment and an offshore company behind the ‘New Bermondsey’ regeneration scheme, which threatened Millwall’s stadium The Den. The scheme is already under scrutiny by an independent inquiry under Lord Dyson, former Master of the Rolls.

While in Blackburn candidate Duncan Miller represents the long-running ‘Stop Venkys’ movement, opposed to the Indian poultry dynasty (a sort of subcontinental KFC) who took over Blackburn Rovers in 2010. The once proud Lancashire club – Premier League champions as recently as 1995 – was recently relegated to the third tier of English football.

Venkys' ownership of Blackburn Rovers has been a disaster from day one.

Venkys’ ownership of Blackburn Rovers has been a disaster from day one.

There are a couple of precedents for football fans engaging in electoral politics to air grievances concerning their local clubs.

At the 1999 Hamilton South by-election, Stephen Mungall saved his deposit with 1,075 votes (5.5%) on a platform Hamilton Accies Home, Watson Away. (The local club Hamilton Academicals was at the time homeless, having sold its stadium in 1994, and many fans blamed major shareholder Jim Watson.)

This campaign predated the Electoral Commission and associated legal requirements for parties to register their names and descriptions – so the Accies candidate was able to stand as an independent and put the above description on the ballot paper.

That option is not available for this year’s Millwall and Blackburn candidates, who will appear just as ‘Independent’ on the ballot paper and will have to rely on their campaign literature and publicity to make an impression on voters.

One group of fans did manage to register their own party just over a decade ago. The Seagulls Party was created by fans of Brighton & Hove Albion to campaign against their local council’s decision to refuse planning permission for a new stadium. Edward Bassford of the Seagulls Party polled 21.9% in a Lewes council by-election in August 2006. The following year the party effectively won its campaign, when central government overturned the local council’s decision and stadium development went ahead. Long since dissolved, the Seagulls Party saw its ultimate triumph with Brighton’s promotion to the Premier League this year.

P.S.:
An H&D reader reminds us that in 1987 the well-known Portsmouth football ‘firm’ 6.57 stood a general election candidate in Portsmouth South. Marty ‘Docker’ Hughes polled 455 votes (0.8%).  ‘Docker’ Hughes died in July 1992: friends have ever since sponsored a memorial race at Fontwell Park and (latterly) Goodwood.

Nominations close for General Election

ballot-boxes-460_1418302c

Nominations closed at 4 pm on Thursday for next month’s General Election.

The National Front decided some time ago not to contest this election, so the main nationalist party in contention will be the BNP.

We believe that there will be nine BNP candidates plus another standing without using the party name, and seven English Democrats.  Please note that we include the EDs here because the party absorbed a significant number of former BNP activists a few years ago, but in fact none of the candidates this year are ex-BNP.

After UKIP’s disastrous council election results, it’s no surprise to see the party contesting far fewer constituencies than in 2015: down from 624 to around 400 (the official total has yet to be confirmed). Some of these are sensible decisions not to stand against pro-Brexit MPs, but other cases seem to reflect the party’s rapid decline. For example there are no UKIP candidates in Cornwall, and the party is not standing in Rossendale & Darwen, held by a pro-Remain Tory, Jake Berry.

One beneficiary of UKIP’s decline will be Pendle BNP: the party’s last remaining councillor Brian Parker will have no UKIP opponent at the General Election – neither will party chairman Adam Walker in Bishop Auckland.

 

BNP candidates

Bexleyheath & Crayford
Peter Finch

Bishop Auckland
Adam Walker

Charnwood
Stephen Denham

Dagenham & Rainham
Paul Sturdy

Eltham
John Clarke

Hornchurch & Upminster
David Furness

Old Bexley & Sidcup
Michael Jones

Pendle
Brian Parker

South Basildon & East Thurrock
Paul Borg

Note: Additionally Richard Perry, the BNP’s Eastern regional organiser, is standing in the Maldon constituency but will not have the BNP name on the ballot paper: his party description is ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing Because We Care’, which is among the BNP’s registered descriptions with the Electoral Commission.

 

English Democrat candidates

Barnsley Central
Stephen Morris

Barnsley East
Kevin Riddiough

Bradford South
Therese Hirst

Clacton
Robin Tilbrook

Doncaster North
David Allen

Holborn & St Pancras
Janus Polenceus

NE Cambridgeshire
Stephen Goldspink

 

Le Pen polls best ‘far right’ result since Second World War

Marine Le Pen is likely to poll around 15% in this year's French presid.ential election, but is very unlikely to qualify for the second round run-off

Marine Le Pen polled 34% in this year’s French presidential election.

In the second round of the French presidential election, National Front (FN) leader Marine Le Pen achieved the best ‘far right’ election result since the Second World War, facing former Rothschild banker Emmanuel Macron, who only a year ago formed his own political party En Marche!

Marine Le Pen has won 34%, against 66% for Macron. Around 11% – 4 million French voters cast a “blank” ballot, a record total indicating Macron’s failure to mobilise support among many trade unionists and socialists.

The result represents about double the FN vote on its only previous second round appearance: in 2002 the party’s founder Jean-Marie Le Pen polled 17.8%.

The past year has seen traditional French political parties crushed. Incumbent Socialist President François Hollande was so unpopular that he didn’t even stand for re-election. His replacement as Socialist candidate Benoît Hamon polled only 6.4%. One commentator on the BBC has just admitted: “the Socialist Party as we knew it is now dead.”

Former conservative president Nicolas Sarkozy failed to win his party’s nomination, and his replacement – neo-Thatcherite François Fillon – finished a poor third in the first round with 20.0%, only just ahead of a Marxist candidate.

One consequence of this collapse of traditional parties is that neither Macron nor Le Pen has significant backing in the French parliament, the National Assembly: there will be parliamentary elections later this year.

Macron – a French version of Tony Blair – has won this election. But his pretence to represent something “new” and “anti-establishment” is so thin, and his political programme so utterly vacuous, that Marine Le Pen and the FN can look forward with confidence to representing the future of France: provided they hold the nerve and avoid the ever present temptation of grovelling to the globalisers.

Arron Banks announces plans for post-UKIP movement

Arron Banks

Arron Banks says that UKIP has dispatched itself with “a strategic bullet to the back of the head”.

Following this week’s catastrophic election results which signalled the death of UKIP, the party’s former chief donor Arron Banks has issued a statement condemning new leader Paul Nuttall and confirming plans to launch “a new movement with radical policies and direct democracy”.

According to Banks this will “launch in the autumn after the General Election, once the electoral map has been redrawn”.

A close ally of ex-UKIP leader Nigel Farage, Banks contrasted the successes of the Farage era with the shambles that UKIP has become:

“If we use the analogy of UKIP as a racing car, Nigel was a skilled driver who drove the car around the track faster and faster, knowing when to take risks, delighting the audience.

“The current leadership has crashed the car, at the first bend of the race, into the crowd, killing the driver and spectators.

“As one of the Leave.EU team said to me: a strategic bullet to the back of the head.

“It’s a sorry state of affairs.”

Click here to read H&D‘s report on this week’s local elections.

Both here and in the journal Heritage and Destiny, we will continue to bring you updated news of the general election campaign as it affects racial nationalist parties and the broader movement.

 

UKIP disappears from the political map

Will Nigel Farage return to spearhead UKIP's General Election campaign, displacing his useless successor Paul Nuttall (right)

The Party’s Over: Nigel Farage (left) is no doubt relieved not to be sharing the blame for terrible UKIP results in 2017.

The 2017 elections have been even worse than predicted for UKIP – wiped off the map with not a single councillor re-elected. The collapsing share of the vote across what were once UKIP’s strongest counties repeated the pattern observed over the past year in H&D‘s regular analysis of local by-elections: down from 14.3% to 7.4% in Lincolnshire; from 20.0% to 6.3% in Suffolk; from 23.5% to 6.0% in Norfolk; and from 27.0% to 7.4% in Essex.

The party’s only success was in Padiham & Burnley West, Lancashire, where UKIP’s Alan Hosker won the county council seat once held by the BNP’s Sharon Wilkinson. (Strangely UKIP had failed to contest this in 2013 when Cllr Wilkinson stood down.) Elsewhere in Lancashire there were some UKIP disappointments in target divisions such as Preston East, where they polled 11.3%. (H&D editor Mark Cotterill had polled 22.3% in Preston East on slightly different boundaries in 2009.) In the neighbouring Preston South East UKIP fared even worse with just 6.7%, justly punished for failure to do any campaigning in these White working class areas of the city which voted heavily Leave in last year’s EU referendum.

Total UKIP support in Lancashire was down from 14.7% to 3.0% (partly reflecting a reduced number of candidates); similarly UKIP’s vote in Devon fell from 23.3% to 4.4%.

In overnight results UKIP votes collapsed across two former strongholds, Essex and Lincolnshire.

The landslide win for ex-UKIP councillor Kerry Smith, re-elected as an independent, contrasted with the near-annihilation of his former party.

The landslide win for ex-UKIP councillor Kerry Smith, re-elected as an independent, contrasted with the near-annihilation of his former party.

Ex-UKIP county councillor Kerry Smith (who was forced to quit the party in 2014 after a row over “offensive remarks”) retained his seat with a vastly increased majority, standing as an independent in the Basildon Westley Heights division of Essex. UKIP didn’t put up a candidate against him. Cllr Smith won 60.6% of the vote this time, compared to 29.0% when he first won the seat for UKIP in 2013.

But UKIP’s own official candidates were badly beaten. Every Essex UKIP seat was lost, including another Basildon division, Laindon Park & Fryerns, where they were pushed into third place.

Staying in Essex, UKIP lost the Thundersley division (part of the Castle Point constituency) to the Tories by almost 2,000 votes.  (Last time UKIP won this by 200.) Another Castle Point seat was lost to the Tories, again by more than 2,000 votes, in the South Benfleet division; while in the Harlow divisions UKIP incompetence led to their candidates failing to be validly nominated.

Labour’s defeats last night and today will make bigger headlines (especially some heavy losses to the Tories in Warwickshire) but by any objective measure this has been an even worse election for Paul Nuttall than for Jeremy Corbyn.

If this disaster is repeated at the General Election next month, Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks are sure to go ahead with their plans for a new ‘Patriotic Alliance’ to replace UKIP.

By far the best nationalist results were predictably in Pendle, an area of Lancashire where UKIP failed to put up any candidates and where the BNP has its sole remaining borough councillor, Brian Parker.

Mr Parker finished third with 719 votes (20.4%) in Pendle Central; his colleague John Rowe who was the only White candidate for the Nelson East division polled 500 votes (10.8%).

Ex-serviceman Pete Molloy, a former BNP activist, achieved one of the few good nationalist votes standing as an independent.

Ex-serviceman Pete Molloy, a former BNP activist, achieved one of the few good nationalist votes standing as an independent.

Outside Pendle the outstanding nationalist performance was ex-BNP activist Pete Molloy’s 601 votes (14.8%) standing as an independent in Spennymoor, Durham. Admittedly this is one of the rare areas that elects independent councillors, but Mr Molloy polled more than double the UKIP vote. On a bleak night for both nationalists and UKIP this was a rare bright spot.

Another ex-BNP (and in his case ex-BDP) candidate, ex-councillor Graham Partner, polled 66 votes (2.3%) in Coalville North, Leicestershire.

Among the overnight results the BNP highlight was their Eastern region organiser Richard Perry almost overtaking the fading UKIP in Heybridge & Tollesbury, an area of Essex where the BNP has campaigned almost solely on the issue of opposing “unsustainable” housing developments. Mr Perry polled 422 votes (8.2%), only 12 votes behind UKIP – but more than 2,500 votes behind the Tory winner.

In nearby Maldon, Mr Perry’s BNP colleague Trevor Cable (again fighting on the “unsustainable housing” issue and with this slogan on the ballot paper) fared less well with 115 votes (2.4%).

In the Basildon Pitsea division, BNP candidates Paul Borg and Christine Winter finished bottom of the poll with 2.1% (the same as the NF polled in 2013). Again UKIP were badly beaten here, in a division where they had been only just behind Labour in 2013.

The BNP’s Paul Hooks was again bottom of the poll in Halstead, polling 0.5% (down from 1.1% last time).

As in Essex, UKIP was wiped out in Lincolnshire (another former stronghold which includes the Boston & Skegness constituency targeted by Nuttall) losing seats in Boston and elsewhere to the Tories.

The UKIP vote across Lincolnshire was almost halved to 7.4% from 14.3% in 2013.

Robert Ashton, the BNP’s only Lincolnshire candidate, polled 46 votes (1.5%) in Louth South. In Hayling Island, Hampshire, the sole BNP candidate John Moore took 30 votes (0.6%).

Amid the UKIP disaster in Kent, where they lost every single seat, the BNP polled modestly – even in Swanley, where there was no UKIP candidate, BNP candidate Cliff Le May managed only 2.5%, while Ronald Ball polled 1.6% in Dartford NE and Michael Cope 0.9% in Dartford W.

The only racial nationalist result in Wales was in Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd, Bridgend, where the NF’s Adam Lloyd polled 21 votes (3.0%).

Likewise the NF was the only racial nationalist party with a presence in Scotland. Outgoing NF chairman Dave MacDonald polled 29 votes (1.2%) in the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen; his colleague Billy Watson had 10 votes (0.2%) in the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

 

Kevin Bryan (right) about to return as NF Chairman, was the only NF candidate in England, with his colleague Adam Lloyd (left) the only racial nationalist candidate from any party in Wales.

Kevin Bryan (right) about to return as NF Chairman, was the only NF candidate in England, with his colleague Adam Lloyd (left) the only racial nationalist candidate from any party in Wales.

NF chairman Kevin Bryan will be disappointed with his 50 votes (1.6%) in Whitworth & Bacup, Lancashire, where even UKIP only polled 9.6%: the local contest there was dominated by the Tories, who gained this redrawn seat from Labour by just 17 votes. Even before this result H&D understands the NF was likely not to field General Election candidates, having quite reasonably concluded that this fake ‘snap’ election is likely to be dominated by the destruction of UKIP and a voter reaction against Corbyn’s Labour – there will be little time for smaller nationalist parties to develop a campaign.

The only British Democratic Party candidate, Kevan Stafford in Loughborough South, Leicestershire, polled 30 votes (1.1%) in Loughborough South, Leicestershire, a division which was similarly dominated by a close Tory-Labour contest and where UKIP slipped to 3.4%. The difference is that both Mr Bryan and Mr Stafford had actually done some work (unlike most UKIP candidates), so their result was scant reward for serious effort.

There were contrasting results for the two British Resistance candidates in Worcestershire.  Party leader and former BNP organiser Carl Mason polled 11 votes (0.5%) in Nunnery, while his colleague Linda Bell fared better with 39 votes (2.0%) in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Dr Andrew Emerson, leader of another post-BNP party Patria, polled 21 votes (0.5%) in Chichester W, West Sussex. In a simultaneous by-election for East Wittering ward, Chichester, Dr Emerson polled 18 votes (1.4%).

English Democrat leader Robin Tilbrook was the only county council candidate for his much reduced party, polling 1.7% in Ongar & Rural – an Essex division where UKIP lost two-thirds of their 2013 vote. Elsewhere the headline result for the EDs was in the Greater Manchester mayoral election, where ED candidate Steve Morris with 2.0% finished ahead of the scandal-plagued UKIP rabbi Shneur Odze on 1.9%. Meanwhile the ED mayoral candidate for Cambridgeshire & Peterborough, Stephen Goldspink, polled 1.1%.

 

 

 

 

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