German patriots advance again in Saarland regional election

Saarland election 2017

A party which has existed for less than three years now has representatives in 12 of the 16 German regional parliaments.

Racial nationalists are closely watching politics in Germany, where incumbent – supposedly ‘conservative’ – Chancellor Angela Merkel shamefully betrayed her people in 2015 by welcoming hordes of immigrants, with horrific consequences.

A general election is due in September this year, which polls and most observers predict Merkel will lose. She has been in power with the support of the socialist SPD, but increasing numbers of German voters have been flocking to the anti-immigration party Alternative for Germany (AfD), which has only existed since 2013 and has become increasingly radical on immigration and related questions since 2015.

Today there was an election for the Landtag (regional parliament) of Saarland, a region with a population around one million, centred on the city of Saarbrücken, near the German-French border.

A campaign poster for the anti-immigration party AfD, advertising a Saarbrücken event addressed by two AfD leaders

A campaign poster for the anti-immigration party AfD, advertising a Saarbrücken event addressed by two AfD leaders

Slightly surprisingly, early results show that Merkel’s party has polled quite well in Saarland, perhaps because conservative voters were alarmed at the possibility of a socialist alliance with the ex-communist Left Party (Die Linke).

Some weak-willed middle class voters of this sort have thus been prepared to ignore or forgive Merkel’s shocking betrayal of German interests.  Nevertheless, it was a positive sign that AfD won Saarland Landtag seats for the first time today, polling somewhere over 6%.

The next German regional election is in North Rhine-Westphalia – the largest of Germany’s states with a population of 18 million, including four big cities: Cologne, Düsseldorf, Dortmund and Essen. This NRW region has taken a vast number of the immigrants admitted by Merkel. Seen as a socialist stronghold, NRW votes on May 14th. A week earlier French voters will have the decisive second round in their presidential election. Marine Le Pen is expected to contest that second round against a centrist, pro-immigration candidate.

Anti-immigration party’s new gains in German capital

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The anti-immigration party Alternative for Germany (AfD) – which has only existed since 2013 – has won seats for the first time in the regional parliament of the German capital Berlin, polling 14.2%.

This continues a remarkable run of gains for AfD, most notably earlier this month when it pushed Chancellor Angela Merkel’s CDU into third place in the north-eastern region of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

Berlin was always going to be much tougher territory for AfD, so 14.2% here is a very great achievement, even though the party is in fifth place behind the socialist SPD, the CDU, Greens and far-left Die Linke (Left Party). Western Europe’s capital cities are all more left-wing than the rest of their countries, with higher ethnic minority populations: Berlin in particular has a strong left-wing element dating back to the early 20th century.

In the long term perhaps the most significant aspect is that the so-called “grand coalition” – a deal between SPD and CDU (similar to a Labour-Tory pact) – lost so many votes that it will no longer be able to govern the Berlin region.

The SPD (who remained in first place with a reduced vote of 21.6%) will probably now seek a new alliance in Berlin’s regional parliament with the Greens and the Left Party.  In the long term this is very good news for AfD, as it heralds a more honest politics that could undermine Merkel’s coalition with the SPD at national level.

For the first time, a window of opportunity is visible for AfD to achieve some share of power next year: for many conservatives within Merkel’s party will begin asking – if the SPD can form coalitions with the neo-communists in Die Linke, why shouldn’t conservatives look for a coalition with the anti-immigration AfD?

 

Merkel defeated on home turf: Europe’s nationalist surge continues

Afd - MV poster 2016

Europe’s most powerful ‘conservative’ leader – German Chancellor Angela Merkel – was humiliated a fortnight ago by a new nationalist party in elections for the regional parliament of her home area Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. This weekend she faces further problems in Berlin, Germany’s capital.

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is on the north-east border of today’s Germany (though many traditional ethnic German areas are further east, presently within the borders of Poland or Russia).  It includes Rostock and several other Hanseatic ports whose trading agreements were the origins of the modern German state: the regional parliament (or Landtag) is in the medieval city of Schwerin.

As elsewhere in Merkel’s Germany, economic crisis has been exacerbated by the flood of immigrants – encouraged by a supposedly ‘conservative’ chancellor and her government.  Both in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and nationwide, government is a coalition of Merkel’s CDU-CSU and the social democratic SPD.

In other words Germans have the equivalent of a Tory-Labour coalition, eagerly promoting immigration and ‘one-worldism’!

Understandably German voters have increasingly turned against this wicked betrayal.  Just over three years ago a new party was created called ‘Alternative for Germany’ (Alternative für Deutschland – AfD).  At first this was a milder version of our UKIP, focused on calls for reform of the EU rather than withdrawal, and careful not to say anything too ‘extreme’ about immigration.

AfD leader Frauke Petry with her partner and MEP Marcus Pretzell: they have sought an alliance between AfD and Marine Le Pen's French National Front

AfD leader Frauke Petry with her partner and MEP Marcus Pretzell: they have sought an alliance between AfD and Marine Le Pen’s French National Front

However, as detailed in several recent issues of Heritage and Destiny, the AfD has moved in a significantly more radical direction over the past year or so under its new leader Frauke Petry.  Ignoring the usual smears, the party has continued to pick up support.

The elections on September 4th were the first time that AfD had contested the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern landtag – and for the first time nationwide the party finished ahead of Merkel’s CDU!

The SPD was in first place (as at the previous election in 2011) but its vote fell from 35.6% to 30.6%.  AfD was in second place with 20.8% in the party’s first campaign for this landtag.  The CDU vote dropped from 23% to 19%, while the neo-Marxist ‘Left Party’ (Die Linke) was down from 18.4% to 13.2%.

Two parties dropped out of the landtag after their vote fell below the 5% threshold.  The Greens are down from 8.7% to 4.8%, while the nationalist NPD (many of whose votes went to AfD) lost half its support: down from 6% to 3%.  Germany’s once powerful liberal party the FDP once again failed to gain seats after polling 3%, as in 2011.

In terms of landtag seats the SPD-CDU coalition will be able to continue, though with a much smaller majority.  Theoretically the two left of centre parties – SPD and Left – would also have (just) sufficient MPs for a coalition, but fear of association with communism still prevents the SPD from admitting its ideological kinship with Die Linke.

Despite its success in this election, the AfD would not have the numbers to form a governing coalition in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern with the CDU.  But this result will add to the pressure on Chancellor Merkel from within her own party, especially from the CDU’s Bavarian sister party CSU, in advance of next year’s federal elections.

A week after this shock advance, AfD achieved more modest results in local council elections across Lower Saxony, and this weekend sees elections to the Berlin landtag, again governed by a “grand coalition” between SPD and CDU.  Here nationalists have traditionally been much weaker – the NPD polled only 2.5% in 2011.  Again the CDU could be pushed into third place, though probably by the Greens, with the AfD not far behind.

 

AfD's Mecklenburg-Vorpommern leader Leif-Erik Holm (right) celebrates with fellow campaigners including Brandenburg AfD chairman Alexander Gauland (left).

AfD’s Mecklenburg-Vorpommern leader Leif-Erik Holm (right) celebrates with fellow campaigners including Brandenburg AfD chairman Alexander Gauland (left).

 

The battle for fundamental freedoms: German nationalist party splits

The German nationalist party AfD is facing a civil war between its two national leaders: Frauke Petry (left) and Jörg Meuthen.

The German nationalist party AfD is facing a civil war between its two national leaders: Frauke Petry (left) and Jörg Meuthen.

During the past year Alternative für Deutschland (Alternative for Germany – AfD) has been the most successful and rapidly growing nationalist party in Europe.

In 2015 control of AfD passed from its founders – who were essentially a liberal version of UKIP, focused on reform of (not withdrawal from) the EU – to a more radical faction who spoke openly about the need to protect German identity from mass immigration.

Though ‘moderate’ factions (including most of the party’s MEPs) had argued that this ‘extremism’ would be electorally disastrous, AfD has in fact become stronger, consistently winning seats in Germany’s regional/state parliaments, or länder.

Now the party’s most liberal elements are attempting a coup against the new leadership: at stake is whether AfD’s de facto leader Frauke Petry will be its figurehead and candidate for Chancellor against Angela Merkel in next year’s federal elections (scheduled for August-September 2017).  The liberal faction would prefer Jörg Meuthen, who acts as co-spokesman with Frau Petry at national level, and was head of the AfD group in the state parliament of Baden-Württemberg.

A few weeks ago Herr Meuthen demanded the expulsion of one of his AfD colleagues in Baden-Württemberg, Wolfgang Gedeon, after it was found that Herr Gedeon had written a book four years ago (entitled Green Communism and the Dictatorship of Minorities) comparing the German state’s treatment of historians such as David Irving (and German writers such as the former leftist Horst Mahler) to the persecution of ‘dissidents’ by communist and other totalitarian regimes.

Showdown in the Baden-Württemberg state parliament between AfD regional leader Jörg Meuthen (left) and one of his own MPs, Wolfgang Gedeon (right).

Showdown in the Baden-Württemberg state parliament between AfD regional leader Jörg Meuthen (left) and one of his own MPs, Wolfgang Gedeon (right).

The book was denounced as ‘anti-semitic’, but when AfD’s group of Baden-Württemberg MPs met last week, the liberal faction was unable to secure the necessary two-thirds majority to expel Herr Gedeon.  Although Herr Gedeon resolved the matter a day later by resigning voluntarily, Herr Meuthen and his supporters used the dispute as a pretext to break away and form their own parliamentary group, registering themselves as Alternative für Baden-Württemberg.

They have now taken the matter to AfD’s national ruling executive, demanding that this new group be recognised as the official party affiliate.  In statements to the German press, the liberal faction have insisted: “I don’t know how you can be in two minds about this. Anyone who reads this can see it is clearly antisemitic.  … We are Alternative for Germany, the others are antisemites for Germany.”

Herr Meuthen is now using the issue to force a showdown with Frau Petry, demanding that she should be locked out of the party’s national headquarters, even though she is seen as effectively the AfD leader.

Unless the dispute is resolved decisively and quickly, the only winner will be Germany’s pro-immigration Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Election success for German anti-immigration party

Frauke Petry, leader of Alternative for Germany, which achieved tremendous gains in German elections yesterday.

Frauke Petry, leader of Alternative for Germany, which achieved tremendous gains in German elections yesterday.

The anti-immigration party “Alternative for Germany” (Alternative für Deutschland – AfD) has made worldwide headlines this week after yesterday’s elections to three German state parliaments (Landtag) in which AfD finished in second or third place.

AfD was only formed in 2013 and until last summer was mainly focused on reform of the European Union and the single currency: effectively a milder version of our UKIP. In the European Parliament its members were in the same transnational group as David Cameron’s Conservatives and the Polish governing party Law & Justice. They have now been expelled from this group and will probably ally with the Austrian Freedom Party and Marine Le Pen’s French National Front.

AfD was transformed into a more radical anti-immigration force less than a year ago under a new leader – Frauke Petry – and is now seen as the main voice for Germans disgusted by the liberal immigration policy of their Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Mrs Merkel’s Conservative CDU and its traditional opposition the SPD (similar to our Labour Party) were the big losers in yesterday’s elections, and the anti-immigration AfD were the big winners, fighting all three states for the first time.

The most dramatic result was in the former East German state of Saxony-Anhalt, where AfD finished second with 24.2% and will now be the main opposition to an unprincipled coalition of conservatives, socialists and greens who will attempt to govern the region. The nationalist NPD (which is fighting a court case against an attempted ban by German authorities) polled 1.9% (down from 4.6% last time) and a new nationalist party called Die Rechte (The Right) polled 0.2%.

AfD finished third in the traditionally prosperous and conservative western German state of Baden-Württemberg, polling 15.1%. The NPD (for whom this was never a stronghold) slipped from 1.0% to 0.4% and another nationalist party, the Republikaner (who held seats in Baden-Württemberg from 1992 to 2001) similarly fell from 1.1% to 0.3%.

In another western German state – Rhineland Palatinate – the AfD again finished third with 12.6%, while the NPD and Republikaner polled 0.5% (down from 1.1%) and 0.2% (down from 0.8%).

The immigration crisis and the rise of AfD inspired large numbers of Germans to take part in these elections: turnout was 61.1% in Saxony Anhalt and 70.4% in Baden-Württemberg and Rhineland Palatinate.

We can now expect AfD (despite the levels of support achieved in these elections) to be intensively targeted by Germany’s heavily politicised security agencies, who will support efforts by establishment politicians to intimidate anti-immigration campaigners.

Thought-crime in today’s Europe

DeckertStolzRenouf-672pxWide

German lawyer Sylvia Stolz (centre) after her release from an earlier presence sentence, seen here with human rights activists Günter Deckert (left) and Lady Michèle Renouf.

 

German lawyer Sylvia Stolz has been given a 20 month prison sentence for comments she made during a speech at a conference in Switzerland.  She has already served more than three years in prison from 2008 to 2011 for her defence of client Ernst Zündel.

Several European countries have laws that ban any questioning of the history of the ‘Holocaust’, turning the alleged murder of six million Jews in homicidal gas chambers during the Second World War into a form of religious ‘truth’ that cannot be challenged.

Normal historical analysis and debate is thus condemned as a form of blasphemy, and punished by long prison sentences.  For example Horst Mahler, another German lawyer who dared to challenge established historical legends, has been imprisoned since 2009.

Sylvia Stolz’s latest ‘crime’ was committed at the Anti-Censorship Coalition Conference in Switzerland in November 2012.  A video of this ‘criminal’ speech, with English subtitles, can be viewed below:

While sentencing Frau Stolz to prison, the judge in her latest case indicated that he fully expects her to appeal, and she will not begin her sentence until the appeal process has ended.

In fact it is likely that the German authorities have created a serious embarrassment for themselves, by prosecuting Frau Stolz for pointing out facts that were actually accepted by German courts themselves when sentencing former Auschwitz guards at trials during the 1960s.  During those cases the German courts themselves admitted the absence of evidence regarding the locations of the alleged crimes of the ‘Holocaust’; the lack of any judicial findings regarding corpses or traces of the murders concerned; the lack of judicial assessment of witness statements, or of the documents or other evidence; and the lack of any documentary proof establishing the National Socialists’ intention to destroy the Jewish people in part or in whole (i.e. to commit genocide).

Yet to make these very same observations – even in the very same terms as used by the German courts themselves during the 1960s – is now a criminal act in 21st century Germany.

Though here in the UK we have not yet descended into such a Kafkaesque nightmare of bizarre criminal trials, there are attempts to extend our own notorious ‘race laws’ to encompass the criminalisation of ‘Holocaust denial’.  Moreover the British authorities have signed up to the Stockholm International Conference on the teaching of the ‘Holocaust’, which instructed schools as follows:

“Care must be taken not to give a platform for deniers – do not treat the denial of the Holocaust as a legitimate historical argument, or seek to disprove the deniers’ position through normal historical debate and rational argument.”

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