Pro-Farage candidate wins UKIP leadership

Henry Bolton (left) – winner of the UKIP leadership race – with Nigel Farage

Despite all the hype, UKIP’s small-c conservative membership eventually voted for the most obviously “respectable” leadership candidate.

Former intelligence officer Henry Bolton was today elected UKIP leader with 3,874 votes (29.9%), ahead of the anti-Islam campaigner Anne Marie Waters on 2,755 (21.3%). The party’s peculiar first-past-the-post, single ballot system – and the fact that there were seven candidates on the ballot paper, six of whom had a serious chance – meant it was always likely that the winner would have less than one third of the membership’s support.

Turnout was only 46.6%, reflecting the fact that many of those nominally listed as party members (and entitled to vote) have already quit UKIP and had no interest in its leadership contest.

Bolton had warned that a victory for Waters and her EDL backers would risk UKIP becoming some form of “nazi party”. He will now claim a clear mandate, since the two most obvious anti-Islam candidates (Ms Waters and GLA member Peter Whittle) had only 32.2% between them, so even with a transferable vote Ms Waters would not have won.

Mixed-race GLA member David Kurten finished third with 2,201 votes (17.0%); Welsh businessman and libertarian John Rees-Evans fourth on 2,021 (15.6%); original bookies’ favourite Peter Whittle fifth on 1,413 (10.9%), after much of his support drained to Ms Waters; Rotherham parliamentary candidate Jane Collins a surprisingly poor sixth on 566 (4.4%) despite having been backed by two former rival candidates who withdrew in her favour; and space-travel enthusiast Aidan Powlesland seventh on 85 (0.65%).

All eyes now are on Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks, who had plans to launch a new breakaway movement within days if Waters or Whittle were elected. Their decision may now depend on whether Henry Bolton is able to secure constitutional changes reducing the role of the party’s executive and enhancing the leadership’s power.

UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters (left) promoting the UK launch of anti-Islam group PEGIDA alongside the EDL founder Tommy Robinson (centre) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston

The most likely short-term breakaway is now from the other side of the party: Anne Marie Waters and her Islam-obsessed faction.

One of Ms Waters’s leading allies, Paul Weston of Liberty GB, reacted badly to the result, tweeting: “UKIP needed a revolutionary leader, instead it got Mr Establishment Henry Bolton OBE who will do nothing whatsoever about Islam.”

Another close Waters associate, EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias Tommy Robinson), similarly commented: “UKIP are now irrelevant when it comes to the biggest threat our country faces. We need a political voice to oppose Islam like Wilders & Le Pen.”

By contrast third-placed David Kurten and fellow candidate Jane Collins were quick to tweet their loyalty to the new leader.

H&D will have a fuller report on the UKIP contest later this weekend, and a detailed analysis in issue 81 of what these developments mean for the British nationalist movement.

Anne Marie Waters now favourite to win UKIP leadership

UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters (left) promoting the UK launch of anti-Islam group PEGIDA alongside the EDL founder Tommy Robinson (centre) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston

Anti-Islam campaigner Anne Marie Waters is now favourite to win the UKIP leadership. The result will be announced at the party’s conference in Torquay on 29th September.

Ms Waters is an associate of EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias ‘Tommy Robinson’), and one of her campaign organisers is ex-BNP official Jack Buckby. Most of the UKIP establishment, including almost all of its MEPs, are set to quit if she wins the leadership, but ordinary members seem more receptive to her obsessional focus on Islam.

Despite Jack Buckby’s involvement in her campaign, Ms Waters has indicated that she would not allow former BNP or NF members to join UKIP (maintaining the present constitutional ban on such applicants).  However a Waters-led UKIP would almost certainly attract a flood of applications from supporters of the EDL and other anti-Islamist groups such as Pegida and Liberty GB.

For almost the entire campaign (since the resignation of Paul Nuttall just after the general election) GLA member Peter Whittle had been favourite to win UKIP’s leadership election, but heavy bets have been placed on Ms Waters in the last few days, making her the new favourite with bookmakers including Ladbrokes, Bet Fred, Coral and Betfair.

Dark horse UKIP leadership candidate Henry Bolton has extensive experience as a military intelligence officer and counter-terrorism expert

Rival candidate Henry Bolton (favoured by much of the UKIP establishment) seems to have overplayed his hand by warning last week that UKIP “could see a swing away from our traditional, secular values and stances; towards something far darker… we could easily slip towards the ideals of National Socialism. The last thing UKIP needs is to become the UK Nazi Party.”

UKIP members seems to have viewed this intervention (quite rightly) as ludicrous hype.  Anne Marie Waters is an Islam-obsessed crank, but she isn’t a “Nazi”!

UKIP plot to block anti-Islam takeover

Jane Collins (right) now has the support of three former rival candidates in her bid for UKIP leadership – though her fellow Yorkshire & Humber MEP Mike Hookem (left) is supporting Henry Bolton

Four of the candidates in the chaotic UKIP leadership election have united in a last-ditch effort to block anti-Islamist candidates Anne Marie Waters and Peter Whittle.

There had been eleven leadership candidates, but Scottish MEP David Coburn and two ex-Tories – Gloucestershire councillor Ben Walker and former Hertfordshire councillor Marion Mason – have abandoned their own campaigns and now back Jane Collins, a Yorkshire MEP who polled 22% at the Rotherham by-election in 2012.

This new alliance calling itself UKIP United will be formally launched tomorrow at a 10am Westminster press conference, and backs Jane Collins for UKIP leader with Coburn to be her deputy and Walker to be appointed party chairman. UKIP United is supported by one of the party’s biggest donors, retired bookmaker Alan Bown.

In a letter released to party members yesterday, Ms Collins strongly criticised both the outgoing leadership of Paul Nuttall and his general election campaign team.  At several points in her letter she attacks small groups of London activists, in an appeal to party members outside the capital and an implied attack on leadership favourite Peter Whittle (described by the Jewish Chronicle as “the Israel-loving friendly face of UKIP”) who is a member of the London Assembly and was last year’s UKIP candidate for Mayor of London.

Ms Collins denounced this year’s UKIP general election campaign for its obsession with “nonsense about burkas and beekeepers as the leadership lurched from one PR disaster to another, largely of their own making.”

Retiring UKIP leader Paul Nuttall (left), who presided over a disastrous general election campaign this year, is endorsing leeadership favourite Peter Whittle (right).

Paul Nuttall has endorsed Whittle, who has signalled that if elected he would appoint Anne Marie Waters as his deputy.  Ms Waters is presently second favourite for the leadership, but is anathema to many leading figures in the party because of her open involvement with militant anti-Islam groups such as the English Defence League and Pegida.  She is a close ally of EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias ‘Tommy Robinson’) and her campaign team has included former BNP activist Jack Buckby.

None of the ‘moderate’ candidates had emerged as a clear challenger to Whittle and Waters, hence the field thinning out this weekend, but many members will remain confused.  Another of the fringe candidates, former parliamentary candidate David Allen, has also wound up his own campaign and endorsed Henry Bolton, a military intelligence veteran and foreign policy expert who was UKIP candidate for Kent Police & Crime Commissioner last year.

Henry Bolton (left) – dark horse in the UKIP leadership race – with Nigel Farage

Bookmakers have responded to these developments by making Bolton and Collins joint third-favourites, alongside mixed-race David Kurten (another London Assembly member) and Welsh businessman John Rees-Evans.

These four candidates are jostling in hope of emerging as the clear rival to the leading two: Whittle and Waters.  There is one remaining fringe candidate, space travel enthusiast Aidan Powlesland.

Nigel Farage seems to be backing Henry Bolton, while past leadership candidate Bill Etheridge (a West Midlands MEP seen as head of a libertarian faction) has endorsed John Rees-Evans, who would appoint Etheridge as deputy.

Ballot papers began to be sent out to UKIP members this weekend. With seven candidates (rather than the original elevcn) now on the ballot paper, the election will be decided on a simple, Westminster-style first-past-the-post basis, with no second choices available.  The winner will be announced on September 29th at UKIP’s conference in Torquay.

Meanwhile the UKIP youth wing Young Independence planned to hold its conference in Sheffield this weekend, but the event had to be cancelled after militant ‘anti-fascists’ forced the cancellation of two venues. First the Hilton Hotel cancelled the booking claiming that there had been threats to the safety of staff and other guests.  Then a second venue, the Bessemer pub which would have hosted a smaller-scale version of the conference, also cancelled, claiming they had not been told the truth about the booking.

‘Anti-fascists’ would have protested outside the venues, due to the presence of speakers Anne Marie Waters and Martin Sellner, an Austrian anti-immigration campaigner.

Having once been among the leading political parties in Britain – winning more votes than any other party at the 2014 European Parliament election – UKIP has declined to fringe status and is now easy prey for the far left, particularly because unlike racial nationalist activists, UKIP officials have no experience in street politics.

UKIP executive decides not to block EDL-linked candidate

Peter Whittle (left), bookies’ favourite to win the UKIP leadership, with former leader Nigel Farage

UKIP’s latest leadership election will have eleven candidates after the party’s national executive announced yesterday that they had decided not to block an EDL-linked candidate from standing.

‘Moderates’ on the executive tried to block the leadership campaign of Anne Marie Waters, a former Labour Party member whose campaign team includes ex-BNP member Jack Buckby. Ms Waters is a longstanding ally of Paul Weston (head of Liberty GB) and Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, alias ‘Tommy Robinson’ (founder of the English Defence League, EDL).

Liberal media outrage against Ms Waters (typified by a Nick Cohen column in The Observer) is matched by opposition to her candidature within UKIP, almost all of whose MEPs would quit if she became leader or deputy leader. Mike Hookem, UKIP’s deputy chief whip in the European Parliament whose immediate superior – chief whip Stuart Agnew – is Ms Waters only senior supporter, quit in protest yesterday saying that “turning a blind eye to extremist views” was “not something I am prepared to do”.

H&D readers will remember last year’s fracas involving former leadership favourite Steven Woolfe, which seemed to show that Mr Hookem was more likely to inflict a black eye (if provoked) than turn a blind eye.

Among those condemning Ms Waters is rival leadership candidate Jane Collins, an MEP for Yorkshire & Humber who fought two high-profile parliamentary by-elections for UKIP: Barnsley Central in 2011 and Rotherham in 2012, but Ms Collins is a fringe candidate in a contest that (if you believe the bookies) is now realistically a five-horse race.

David Kurten (left) with leadership rival David Coburn MEP

A UKIP establishment bandwagon was growing behind David Kurten, a mixed-race UKIP member of the London Assembly, who now has the backing of the Farage-Banks lobby group Leave.EU.  Leave.EU’s backing for Kurten was a blow to Welsh businessman John Rees-Evans, who has organised a nationwide tour to promote his campaign for ‘direct democracy’ to revive UKIP, but apparent ‘homophobic’ comments by Kurten have revived Rees-Evans’s chances.

The field of ‘moderate’ candidates has been further confused by the late entry into the race of Henry Bolton, a military intelligence veteran who stood for Kent Police & Crime Commissioner last year. Bolton is the dark horse in the race, and seems to be picking up support from ‘moderates’ who think that neither Kurten nor Rees-Evans are serious leadership material.

Libertarians disturbed by the anti-Islamist obsessions of Waters and Peter Whittle (described by the Jewish Chronicle as “the Israel-loving friendly face of UKIP” and current favourite to win, after promising to appoint Waters his deputy) are tending to back David Coburn (UKIP’s only Scottish MEP) or Ben Walker (an ex-Tory and councillor for a Bristol suburb), but some will try to pick a ‘non-Islamophobic’ winner from among Kurten, Rees-Evans and Bolton, so as to block the ‘extremists’ Whittle and Waters.

Coburn and Whittle are gay, while Waters is a lesbian. Former leadership candidate Suzanne Evans was thus able to post on Twitter celebrating the fact that “33% of UKIP’s leadership candidates are gay. What other party has ever been able to say that?”

Surprise candidates joining the race but likely to finish as also-rans include Aidan Powlesland, parliamentary candidate for South Suffolk earlier this year, who is an enthusiast for space exploration; David Allen, 2017 parliamentary candidate for Rochester & Strood; and Marion Mason, a former Tory councillor who was UKIP candidate for Hertfordshire Police & Crime Commissioner.

The result of the leadership election will be announced at UKIP’s conference on September 29th in Torquay, after which senior figures such as Nigel Farage and Arron Banks will get on with the serious business of organising a split.

UKIP economic spokesman quits, criticising libertarian faction

Patrick O’Flynn MEP, who resigned today as UKIP economic spokesman

UKIP economic spokesman Patrick O’Flynn – an MEP for Eastern England who was formerly Political Editor of the Daily Express – has resigned.

While most UKIP news recently has focused on the increasingly influential group in the party that is obsessed with Islam and seeks to take UKIP in an EDL or Pegida-style direction, O’Flynn’s resignation is prompted by a very different split – his disagreement with the ultra-Thatcherite ‘libertarians’ in the party.

O’Flynn said in his resignation statement today:
“It is clear to me that UKIP’s activist base wishes to go in a more libertarian, shrink-the-state and Thatcherite direction when it comes to economic policy.
“Ever since becoming prominent in the party, I have argued for UKIP to be at the common sense centre of politics, rather than allowing itself to be defined as on the right wing. For example, I have sought support for tough measures to combat corporate tax avoidance and proposed a premium rate of VAT for luxury goods in order to make that tax more equitable. I have also championed more resources for the NHS, arguing against those in the party who would prefer to run healthcare on private insurance lines.”

The libertarian faction criticised by O’Flynn advocates policies that might go down well on golf courses and in Rotary Clubs across southern England, but which would kill off any chance of challenging Labour in its northern working-class heartlands.

It remains to be seen which strand of UKIP will dominate in the new movement planned by former leader Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks.

John Rees-Evans, third favourite in this year’s UKIP leadership election, at a hustings during last November’s contest

One of UKIP’s leading libertarians – West Midlands MEP and ex-Tory Bill Etheridge – announced this week that he was withdrawing his nomination for UKIP leader.  Etheridge is bitterly opposed to the two anti-Islamist candidates for leader, London Assembly member Peter Whittle and former Pegida UK deputy leader Anne Marie Waters.

The Guardian today picked up on the story reported by H&D eleven days ago, that Ms Waters’ campaign is being run by former BNP member Jack Buckby.

While a groundswell of members has built up behind the anti-Islamist agenda, making Whittle and Waters the two favourites, most of UKIP’s leading members (including almost all its MEPs) are appalled by the prospect of the party becoming a political wing of the EDL.  They have no clear front-runner to back, but perhaps the most likely challenge to Whittle and Waters is from John Rees-Evans, a Welsh businessman who polled 18.1% in last year’s leadership contest that was won by Paul Nuttall.

A late entrant in the race and potential dark horse is Henry Bolton, former military intelligence officer and counter-terrorism expert, who was UKIP’s candidate last year for Kent Police & Crime Commissioner.

Dark horse UKIP leadership candidate Henry Bolton has extensive experience as a military intelligence officer and counter-terrorism expert

UKIP on verge of split as Islam-obsessed faction attempts takeover

Anne Marie Waters (left) with EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias Tommy Robinson) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston, launching a British version of the German anti-Islam movement PEGIDA

 

The dying United Kingdom Independence Party faces an imminent split as hundred of Islam-obsessed EDL supporters have joined the party in recent weeks, supporting the leadership campaign of former Labour Party activist Anne-Marie Waters, who is an ally of EDL founder ‘Tommy Robinson’. Her campaign is reportedly organised by former BNP activist Jack Buckby, who contested last year’s Batley & Spen by-election as candidate of Liberty GB, seen as a political arm of the EDL.

Most prominent figures in UKIP, including former leader Nigel Farage and almost all of the party’s MEPs, have indicated they will resign from the party if Ms Waters becomes leader.  One problem for the UKIP establishment is that the candidate most likely to defeat Ms Waters – former London mayoral candidate Peter Whittle – is almost equally obsessed by a militantly anti-Islam agenda.

There are suggestions that if Mr Whittle wins he will appoint Ms Waters as his deputy, a scenario which would again lead to a serious split.

 

Jack Buckby (left), now running the Anne Marie Waters campaign for UKIP leader, seen here in his earlier political life with fellow Young BNP official Jack Renshaw. Mr Renshaw has taken a different path: he is due to appear at Preston Magistrates Court on July 28th charged with ‘inciting racial hatred’.

 

Earlier this year a breakaway from UKIP was already being planned by Nigel Farage and his main financial backer Arron Banks.  This was to be called the Patriotic Alliance, and would have taken a clearer hard line on immigration than UKIP has previously espoused, though not a narrow and aggressive focus on Islam as advocated by Waters and Whittle: also it would have avoided the complications of UKIP’s democratic constitution, with power very much in the hands of Banks and Farage rather than an elected committee.

However the Banks-Farage plan has been delayed by June’s general election, rapid electoral collapse of UKIP, and growth of the EDL-style faction.

It now looks likely that UKIP could split into at least three segments.  The Waters-Whittle faction obsessed by opposing Islam; a libertarian faction inspired mainly by reducing state intervention and regulation post-Brexit, in pursuit of an extreme American-style version of Thatcherism; and the Banks-Farage group focused mainly on immigration and perhaps open to allowing members with past affiliation to nationalist parties and groups.

Peter Whittle (right) current favourite in the UKIP leadership race, seen here with outgoing leader Paul Nuttall

Nominations for the UKIP leadership election close on July 28th and the winner will be announced at the party’s national conference in Torquay on September 29th, but by then multiple splits will already be unavoidable.

Nigel Farage has already made clear that he will not stand: ‘Farageistes’ are likely to support either Welsh businessman John Rees-Evans, who finished third in the last UKIP contest won by Paul Nuttall last November, or David Coburn the leader of UKIP in Scotland. (Like rival candidates Peter Whittle and Anne-Marie Waters, Mr Coburn is openly homosexual.)

The libertarian faction (some of whom remind H&D of the ‘loony lib’ factions who operated inside the Federation of Conservative Students during the 1980s) are likely to support West Midlands businessman and MEP Bill Etheridge, a former Tory who also serves on Dudley Borough Council.

Bill Etheridge, leader of UKIP’s libertarian faction, with former fiancée Lorraine Chew

Some of the party mainstream who have personal objections to Mr Etheridge are likely to support Ben Walker, a councillor from the Bristol suburb of Bradley Stoke and another ex-Tory; or they might be tempted to burnish the party’s ‘non-racist’ credentials by electing UKIP’s first mixed race leader, London Assembly member David Kurten.

And as mentioned earlier, the increasing numbers of Islam-obsessed members will back one of the two current favourites, Peter Whittle or Anne Marie Waters.

Whoever wins, UKIP seems set on an irreversible course to make the BNP look credible!

Dying UKIP prepares for leadership contest

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

The United Kingdon Independence Party continues its recent record of embarrassment, stumbling around in search of credible leadership, following last week’s disastrous General Election results.

Today David Coburn, UKIP’s sole MEP in Scotland announced that he would contest the leadership vacated on Friday by Paul Nuttall, who had been in the top job for just over six months. Mr Coburn is an ally of former leader Nigel Farage, and has said that if Farage decides to return he will not stand against him.

On the same day that he expressed his interest in the party leadership, Mr Coburn (who is openly homosexual) received unwelcome publicity in the Daily Record, Scotland’s best-selling newspaper.

The Record published its investigation of Scottish Dawn, described as successor to the nationalist youth movement National Action which is banned under the Terrorism Act.

Today's Daily Record front page

Today’s Daily Record front page

Ruaidhri McKim (a Scottish Dawn activist) was secretly filmed discussing his links to National Action and the Polish nationalist organisation NOP, as well as his membership of UKIP.  Mr McKim said:
I was in UKIP for a while. Then after Brexit I just left because I didn’t see a point in it anymore. There’s lots of radical people within it, but no one with any position is a radical. UKIP Scotland was fucked man. I’ve been drunk with David Coburn – he’s really good fun. He’s a fun guy.

Mr Coburn commented:
I think this chap is grandstanding and blethering and I am surprised you are taking him remotely seriously. I am homosexual, speak Arabic and various other languages and I have spent my entire life fighting ignorance, racial and sexual intolerance. Print this crap and I will sue this individual, you and your organ.

As UKIP continues to flounder, the ugly face of British Conservatism was exposed today when it emerged that the managing director of Jennings Racing (Britain’s largest independent bookmaking chain which trades under the name Jenningsbet) had emailed 500 staff before polling day warning them that only the Conservative Party would resist gambling reforms.

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

Labour and the Liberal Democrats had proposed reducing the maximum stake on the notorious fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) from £100 to £2.  FOBTs are notorious for fleecing gambling addicts who pump the entire contents of their wallets and purses into these terminals which have proliferated on British high streets.

Jenningsbet has 400 terminals spread across 100 high street shops.  Each machine brings in an average of £53,000 per year, with Britain’s gambling addicts losing a record £1.8bn on FOBTs in the year to last September. Jenningsbet is co-owned by three Jewish brothers, the Pears family whose ancestor changed his name from Schleicher on arriving in Britain from Austria in the 19th century.

The Pears family are noted for their philanthropy to Jewish charities and Holocaust education, having established the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck College, London.

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories woulod resist reform of gambling laws

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories would resist reform of gambling laws

 

BNP and other nationalist votes

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and parliamentary candidate Brian Parker

An extraordinary General Election that wiped out Theresa May’s Conservative majority also saw the electoral eclipse of the BNP and the English Democrats, none of whose candidates even came close to saving their deposits.

Brian Parker – the BNP’s sole remaining borough councillor – polled only 718 votes (1.6%) in Pendle, his party’s main target seat.

BNP chairman Adam Walker managed a slightly better result in Bishop Auckland, but was bottom of the poll with 991 votes (2.3%).

Meanwhile the English Democrats’ results were even worse, collapsing from an already low base. As the SNP lost support north of the border it appears that the Union is safe, and logically ‘English’ nationalism has lost relevance.

BNP results

Bexleyheath & Crayford
Peter Finch 0.6%

Bishop Auckland
Adam Walker 2.3%

Charnwood
Stephen Denham 0.6% (-0.4)

Dagenham & Rainham
Paul Sturdy 0.5% (+0.2)

Eltham
John Clarke 1.6%

Hornchurch & Upminster
David Furness 0.7% (+0.3)

Maldon [listed as ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing’: BNP name not on ballot]
Richard Perry 0.5%

Old Bexley & Sidcup
Michael Jones 0.7% (+0.2)

Pendle
Brian Parker 1.6%

South Basildon & East Thurrock
Paul Borg 0.8%

——–

English Democrat candidates

Barnsley Central
Stephen Morris 0.5% (-0.8)

Barnsley East
Kevin Riddiough 0.7% (-0.4)

Bradford South
Thérèse Hirst 0.9%

Clacton
Robin Tilbrook 0.7%

Doncaster North
David Allen 0.9% (-0.3)

Holborn & St Pancras
Janus Polenceus 0.2%

NE Cambridgeshire
Stephen Goldspink 0.5%

Paul Nuttall (left) has succeeded Nigel Farage as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He claims that UKIP will serious challenge Labour in Northern England.

Paul Nuttall (left) succeeded Nigel Farage last year as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He resigned today after electoral humiliation,

Meanwhile those racial nationalists who believed that UKIP offered us some hope must think again after the party suffered a series of crushing defeats, ending with the resignation of humiliated leader Paul Nuttall.

Notable UKIP disasters included Clacton (formerly their sole parliamentary seat until Douglas Carswell’s resignation) where UKIP’s vote fell from 44.4% to 7.6%; Thanet South (where re-elected Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay still faces criminal charges for fraudulent overspending during his defeat of Nigel Farage in 2015) – UKIP vote down from 32.4% to 6.0%; and Boston & Skegness, a key target seat contested by Nuttall himself – UKIP vote down from 33.8% to 7.7%.

The only vaguely credible UKIP result came in Thurrock, where UKIP’s Tim Aker (an MEP from a part-Turkish background) fought a vigorous campaign against pro-Remain Tory MP Jackie Doyle-Price.  However even here the UKIP vote fell from 31.7% to 20.1%. Ms Doyle-Price survived, and Labour pushed UKIP into third place.

 

Arron Banks announces plans for post-UKIP movement

Arron Banks

Arron Banks says that UKIP has dispatched itself with “a strategic bullet to the back of the head”.

Following this week’s catastrophic election results which signalled the death of UKIP, the party’s former chief donor Arron Banks has issued a statement condemning new leader Paul Nuttall and confirming plans to launch “a new movement with radical policies and direct democracy”.

According to Banks this will “launch in the autumn after the General Election, once the electoral map has been redrawn”.

A close ally of ex-UKIP leader Nigel Farage, Banks contrasted the successes of the Farage era with the shambles that UKIP has become:

“If we use the analogy of UKIP as a racing car, Nigel was a skilled driver who drove the car around the track faster and faster, knowing when to take risks, delighting the audience.

“The current leadership has crashed the car, at the first bend of the race, into the crowd, killing the driver and spectators.

“As one of the Leave.EU team said to me: a strategic bullet to the back of the head.

“It’s a sorry state of affairs.”

Click here to read H&D‘s report on this week’s local elections.

Both here and in the journal Heritage and Destiny, we will continue to bring you updated news of the general election campaign as it affects racial nationalist parties and the broader movement.

 

UKIP disappears from the political map

Will Nigel Farage return to spearhead UKIP's General Election campaign, displacing his useless successor Paul Nuttall (right)

The Party’s Over: Nigel Farage (left) is no doubt relieved not to be sharing the blame for terrible UKIP results in 2017.

The 2017 elections have been even worse than predicted for UKIP – wiped off the map with not a single councillor re-elected. The collapsing share of the vote across what were once UKIP’s strongest counties repeated the pattern observed over the past year in H&D‘s regular analysis of local by-elections: down from 14.3% to 7.4% in Lincolnshire; from 20.0% to 6.3% in Suffolk; from 23.5% to 6.0% in Norfolk; and from 27.0% to 7.4% in Essex.

The party’s only success was in Padiham & Burnley West, Lancashire, where UKIP’s Alan Hosker won the county council seat once held by the BNP’s Sharon Wilkinson. (Strangely UKIP had failed to contest this in 2013 when Cllr Wilkinson stood down.) Elsewhere in Lancashire there were some UKIP disappointments in target divisions such as Preston East, where they polled 11.3%. (H&D editor Mark Cotterill had polled 22.3% in Preston East on slightly different boundaries in 2009.) In the neighbouring Preston South East UKIP fared even worse with just 6.7%, justly punished for failure to do any campaigning in these White working class areas of the city which voted heavily Leave in last year’s EU referendum.

Total UKIP support in Lancashire was down from 14.7% to 3.0% (partly reflecting a reduced number of candidates); similarly UKIP’s vote in Devon fell from 23.3% to 4.4%.

In overnight results UKIP votes collapsed across two former strongholds, Essex and Lincolnshire.

The landslide win for ex-UKIP councillor Kerry Smith, re-elected as an independent, contrasted with the near-annihilation of his former party.

The landslide win for ex-UKIP councillor Kerry Smith, re-elected as an independent, contrasted with the near-annihilation of his former party.

Ex-UKIP county councillor Kerry Smith (who was forced to quit the party in 2014 after a row over “offensive remarks”) retained his seat with a vastly increased majority, standing as an independent in the Basildon Westley Heights division of Essex. UKIP didn’t put up a candidate against him. Cllr Smith won 60.6% of the vote this time, compared to 29.0% when he first won the seat for UKIP in 2013.

But UKIP’s own official candidates were badly beaten. Every Essex UKIP seat was lost, including another Basildon division, Laindon Park & Fryerns, where they were pushed into third place.

Staying in Essex, UKIP lost the Thundersley division (part of the Castle Point constituency) to the Tories by almost 2,000 votes.  (Last time UKIP won this by 200.) Another Castle Point seat was lost to the Tories, again by more than 2,000 votes, in the South Benfleet division; while in the Harlow divisions UKIP incompetence led to their candidates failing to be validly nominated.

Labour’s defeats last night and today will make bigger headlines (especially some heavy losses to the Tories in Warwickshire) but by any objective measure this has been an even worse election for Paul Nuttall than for Jeremy Corbyn.

If this disaster is repeated at the General Election next month, Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks are sure to go ahead with their plans for a new ‘Patriotic Alliance’ to replace UKIP.

By far the best nationalist results were predictably in Pendle, an area of Lancashire where UKIP failed to put up any candidates and where the BNP has its sole remaining borough councillor, Brian Parker.

Mr Parker finished third with 719 votes (20.4%) in Pendle Central; his colleague John Rowe who was the only White candidate for the Nelson East division polled 500 votes (10.8%).

Ex-serviceman Pete Molloy, a former BNP activist, achieved one of the few good nationalist votes standing as an independent.

Ex-serviceman Pete Molloy, a former BNP activist, achieved one of the few good nationalist votes standing as an independent.

Outside Pendle the outstanding nationalist performance was ex-BNP activist Pete Molloy’s 601 votes (14.8%) standing as an independent in Spennymoor, Durham. Admittedly this is one of the rare areas that elects independent councillors, but Mr Molloy polled more than double the UKIP vote. On a bleak night for both nationalists and UKIP this was a rare bright spot.

Another ex-BNP (and in his case ex-BDP) candidate, ex-councillor Graham Partner, polled 66 votes (2.3%) in Coalville North, Leicestershire.

Among the overnight results the BNP highlight was their Eastern region organiser Richard Perry almost overtaking the fading UKIP in Heybridge & Tollesbury, an area of Essex where the BNP has campaigned almost solely on the issue of opposing “unsustainable” housing developments. Mr Perry polled 422 votes (8.2%), only 12 votes behind UKIP – but more than 2,500 votes behind the Tory winner.

In nearby Maldon, Mr Perry’s BNP colleague Trevor Cable (again fighting on the “unsustainable housing” issue and with this slogan on the ballot paper) fared less well with 115 votes (2.4%).

In the Basildon Pitsea division, BNP candidates Paul Borg and Christine Winter finished bottom of the poll with 2.1% (the same as the NF polled in 2013). Again UKIP were badly beaten here, in a division where they had been only just behind Labour in 2013.

The BNP’s Paul Hooks was again bottom of the poll in Halstead, polling 0.5% (down from 1.1% last time).

As in Essex, UKIP was wiped out in Lincolnshire (another former stronghold which includes the Boston & Skegness constituency targeted by Nuttall) losing seats in Boston and elsewhere to the Tories.

The UKIP vote across Lincolnshire was almost halved to 7.4% from 14.3% in 2013.

Robert Ashton, the BNP’s only Lincolnshire candidate, polled 46 votes (1.5%) in Louth South. In Hayling Island, Hampshire, the sole BNP candidate John Moore took 30 votes (0.6%).

Amid the UKIP disaster in Kent, where they lost every single seat, the BNP polled modestly – even in Swanley, where there was no UKIP candidate, BNP candidate Cliff Le May managed only 2.5%, while Ronald Ball polled 1.6% in Dartford NE and Michael Cope 0.9% in Dartford W.

The only racial nationalist result in Wales was in Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd, Bridgend, where the NF’s Adam Lloyd polled 21 votes (3.0%).

Likewise the NF was the only racial nationalist party with a presence in Scotland. Outgoing NF chairman Dave MacDonald polled 29 votes (1.2%) in the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen; his colleague Billy Watson had 10 votes (0.2%) in the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

 

Kevin Bryan (right) about to return as NF Chairman, was the only NF candidate in England, with his colleague Adam Lloyd (left) the only racial nationalist candidate from any party in Wales.

Kevin Bryan (right) about to return as NF Chairman, was the only NF candidate in England, with his colleague Adam Lloyd (left) the only racial nationalist candidate from any party in Wales.

NF chairman Kevin Bryan will be disappointed with his 50 votes (1.6%) in Whitworth & Bacup, Lancashire, where even UKIP only polled 9.6%: the local contest there was dominated by the Tories, who gained this redrawn seat from Labour by just 17 votes. Even before this result H&D understands the NF was likely not to field General Election candidates, having quite reasonably concluded that this fake ‘snap’ election is likely to be dominated by the destruction of UKIP and a voter reaction against Corbyn’s Labour – there will be little time for smaller nationalist parties to develop a campaign.

The only British Democratic Party candidate, Kevan Stafford in Loughborough South, Leicestershire, polled 30 votes (1.1%) in Loughborough South, Leicestershire, a division which was similarly dominated by a close Tory-Labour contest and where UKIP slipped to 3.4%. The difference is that both Mr Bryan and Mr Stafford had actually done some work (unlike most UKIP candidates), so their result was scant reward for serious effort.

There were contrasting results for the two British Resistance candidates in Worcestershire.  Party leader and former BNP organiser Carl Mason polled 11 votes (0.5%) in Nunnery, while his colleague Linda Bell fared better with 39 votes (2.0%) in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Dr Andrew Emerson, leader of another post-BNP party Patria, polled 21 votes (0.5%) in Chichester W, West Sussex. In a simultaneous by-election for East Wittering ward, Chichester, Dr Emerson polled 18 votes (1.4%).

English Democrat leader Robin Tilbrook was the only county council candidate for his much reduced party, polling 1.7% in Ongar & Rural – an Essex division where UKIP lost two-thirds of their 2013 vote. Elsewhere the headline result for the EDs was in the Greater Manchester mayoral election, where ED candidate Steve Morris with 2.0% finished ahead of the scandal-plagued UKIP rabbi Shneur Odze on 1.9%. Meanwhile the ED mayoral candidate for Cambridgeshire & Peterborough, Stephen Goldspink, polled 1.1%.

 

 

 

 

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